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research-article

Friction-Induced Vibration due to Mode-Coupling and Intermittent Contact Loss

[+] Author and Article Information
Alborz Niknam

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1263 Lincoln Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901-6899
alborz@siu.edu

Kambiz Farhang

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1263 Lincoln Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901-6899
farhang@siu.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041671 History: Received March 15, 2018; Revised October 02, 2018

Abstract

A two-degree-of-freedom single mass-on-belt model is employed to study friction-induced instability due to mode-coupling. Three springs, one representing contact stiffness, the second providing lateral stiffness and the third providing coupling between tangential and vertical directions, are employed. In the model mass contact and separation is permitted. Therefore, nonlinearity stems from discontinuity due to dependence of friction force on relative mass-belt velocity and separation of mass-belt contact during oscillation. Eigenvalue analysis is carried out to determine the onset of instability. Within the unstable region, four possible phases that include slip, stick, separation, and overshoot, are found as possible modes of oscillation. Piecewise analytical solution is found for each phase of mass motion. Then, numerical analyses are used to investigate the effect of three dimensionless parameters related to belt velocity, friction coefficient and normal load on the mass response. It is found that the mass will always experience stick-slip, separation or both. When separation occurs, mass can overtake the belt causing additional nonlinearity due to friction force reversal. For a given coefficient of friction, the minimum normal load to prevent separation is found proportional to the belt velocity.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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