0
Research Papers

Improved Feasible Load Range and Its Effect on the Frequency Response of Origami-Inspired Vibration Isolators With Quasi-Zero-Stiffness Characteristics1

[+] Author and Article Information
Kazuya Inamoto

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Graduate School of Science and Technology,
Meiji University,
1-1-1, Higashimita, Tama-ku,
Kawasaki 214-8571, Kanagawa, Japan

Sachiko Ishida

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
School of Science and Technology,
Meiji University,
1-1-1, Higashimita, Tama-ku,
Kawasaki 214-8571, Kanagawa, Japan
e-mail: sishida@meiji.ac.jp

1Paper presented at the 2018 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, Quebec City, Canada, August 26–29, 2018. Paper No. DETC2018-85765.

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received April 1, 2018; final manuscript received July 10, 2018; published online October 23, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Ronald N. Miles.

J. Vib. Acoust 141(2), 021004 (Oct 23, 2018) (8 pages) Paper No: VIB-18-1138; doi: 10.1115/1.4041368 History: Received April 01, 2018; Revised July 10, 2018

We describe herein a method for extending the load range of a vibration isolator using a foldable cylinder consisting of a torsional buckling pattern and evaluate the vibration isolating performance through excitation experiments. A previous study determined that the foldable cylinder is bistable and acts as a vibration isolator with nonlinear characteristics in a displacement region, where the spring stiffness is zero. Its spring characteristics and vibration isolating performance were clarified by numerical analysis and excitation experiments. The findings indicated that the vibration in a certain frequency range is reduced where the spring stiffness is zero. However, this vibration isolator has a disadvantage in that it can only support an initial load that transfers to the zero-spring-stiffness region. Therefore, in this research, we improve the position of the linear spring attached to the isolator. As a result, the initial load range is extended by two to four times that of the conventional vibration isolator. Furthermore, the isolating performance is maintained even when the initial load is changed within a given load range.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Carrella, A. , Brennan, M. J. , and Waters, T. P. , 2007, “ Static Analysis of a Passive Vibration Isolator With Quasi-Zero Stiffness Characteristic,” J. Sound Vib., 301(3–5), pp. 678–689. [CrossRef]
Carrella, A. , 2010, “ Passive Vibration Isolators With High-Static-Low-Dynamic-Stiffness,” Doctoral thesis, VDM Verlag, Saarbrücken, Germany. https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/51276/1/P2449.pdf
Kovacic, I. , Brennan, M. J. , and Waters, T. P. , 2008, “ A Study of a Nonlinear Vibration Isolator With a Quasi-Zero Stiffness Characteristic,” J. Sound Vib., 315(3), pp. 700–711. [CrossRef]
Lee, C. M. , Goverdovskiy, V. N. , and Temnikov, A. I. , 2007, “ Design of Springs With Negative Stiffness to Improve Vehicle Driver Vibration Isolation,” J. Sound Vib., 302(4–5), pp. 865–874. [CrossRef]
Fulcher, B. A. , Shahan, D. W. , Haberman, M. R. , Seepersad, C. C. , and Wilson, P. S. , 2014, “ Analytical and Experimental Investigation of Buckled Beams as Negative Stiffness Elements for Passive Vibration and Shock Isolation Systems,” ASME J. Vib. Acoust., 136(3), p. 031009. [CrossRef]
Fujita, E. , 1999, “ New Vibration System Using a Magneto-Spring (in Japanese),” J. Magn. Soc. Jpn., 23(3), pp. 840–846.
Robertson, W. S. , Kidner, M. R. F. , Cazzolato, B. S. , and Zander, A. C. , 2009, “ Theoretical Design Parameters for a Quasi-Zero Stiffness Magnetic Spring for Vibration Isolation,” J. Sound Vib., 326(1–2), pp. 88–103. [CrossRef]
Xu, D. , Yu, Q. , Zhou, J. , and Bishop, S. R. , 2013, “ Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of a Nonlinear Magnetic Vibration Isolator With Quasi-Zero-Stiffness Characteristic,” J. Sound Vib., 332(14), pp. 3377–3389. [CrossRef]
Guest, S. D. , and Pellegrino, S. , 1994, “ The Folding of Triangulated Cylinders, Part I: Geometric Considerations,” ASME J. Appl. Mech., 61(4), pp. 773–777. [CrossRef]
Nojima, T. , 2002, “ Modeling of Folding Patterns in Flat Membranes and Cylinders by Origami,” Int. J. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., 45(1), pp. 364–370.
Nagashima, G. , and Nojima, T. , 1999, “ Development of Foldable Triangulated Cylinder (in Japanese),” Seventh JSME Materials and Processing Conference (M&P), pp. 153–154.
Ishida, S. , Uchida, H. , and Hagiwara, I. , 2014, “ Vibration Isolators Using Nonlinear Spring Characteristics of Origami-Based Foldable Structures (in Japanese),” J. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., 80(820), p. DR0384.
Ishida, S. , Uchida, H. , Shimosaka, H. , and Hagiwara, I. , 2017, “ Design and Numerical Analysis of Vibration Isolators With Quasi-Zero-Stiffness Characteristics Using Bistable Foldable Structures,” ASME J. Vib. Acoust., 139(3), p. 031015. [CrossRef]
Ishida, S. , Suzuki, K. , and Shimosaka, H. , 2017, “ Design and Experimental Analysis of Origami-Inspired Vibration Isolator With Quasi-Zero-Stiffness Characteristic,” ASME J. Vib. Acoust., 139(5), p. 051004. [CrossRef]
Guest, S. D. , and Pellegrino, S. , 1992, “ Inextensional Wrapping of Flat Membranes,” First International Seminar on Structural Morphology, pp. 203–215.
Nojima, T. , 2001, “ Structure With Folding Lines, Folding Line Forming Mold, and Folding Line Forming Method,” Tanaka Patent Office, Tokyo, Japan, Patent No. WO/2001/081821. https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2001081821
Miura, K. , 2013, “ Foldable Plate Structures and Applications,” Bull. Soc. Automot. Technol. Jpn., 67(5), pp. 52–58 (in Japanese).
Tachi, T. , 2009, “ One-DOF Cylindrical Deployable Structures With Rigid Quadrilateral Panels,” International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS) Symposium, Valencia, Spain, Sept. 28–Oct. 2, pp. 1–11.
Ishida, S. , Nojima, T. , and Hagiwara, I. , 2015, “ Regular Folding Pattern for Deployable Nonaxisymmetric Tubes,” ASME J. Mech. Des., 137(9), p. 091402. [CrossRef]
Natori, M. C. , Katsumata, N. , Yamakawa, H. , Sakamoto, H. , and Kishimoto, N. , 2013, “ Conceptual Model Study Using Origami for Membrane Space Structures,” ASME Paper No. DETC2013-13490.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Load–height diagram of the bistable cylinder and a linear spring

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Load–height diagram of the bistable cylinder combined with the linear spring

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Load–height diagram of the linear spring applied to the bistable cylinder at heights of 100 mm, 90 mm, and 75 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Load–height diagram of the bistable cylinder with the linear spring applied at heights of 100 mm, 90 mm, and 75 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Foldable cylinder consisting of a torsional buckling pattern: (a) spatial state and (b) folded state

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Developed pattern of the foldable cylinder, design variables, and nomenclature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Two types of vibration isolators: left: α = 50 deg and right: α = 40 deg

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Gap between the shaft and the central linear spring

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Overview of tensile/compression test of the vibration isolator without the central linear spring

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Force–height diagram of the vibration isolators of α = 40 deg and 50 deg without the central linear spring

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Force–height diagram of the vibration isolator of α = 40 deg with the central spring for gaps of 0 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm, and 20 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Force–height diagram of the vibration isolator of α = 50 deg with the central spring for gaps of 0 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm, and 20 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Setup of the excitation experiment: (a) overview and (b) vibration isolator with sensors

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Transmissibility of the vibration isolator under conditions of |A| = 5 mm: (a) α = 40 deg with a gap of 0 mm; (b) α = 40 deg with a gap of 15 mm; (c) α = 50 deg with a gap of 10 mm; (d) α = 50 deg with a gap of 15 mm; and (e) α = 50 deg with a gap of 20 mm

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In