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Research Papers

Design Space Exploration of a Beam Flexible Hub Concept for an Inside-Out Ceramic Turbine Using a Simplified Rotordynamic Finite Element Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Céderick Landry

Institut Interdisciplinaire D'innovation
Technologique,
Université de Sherbrooke,
3000 boul. de l'Université,
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada
e-mail: Cederick.Landry@USherbrooke.ca

Patrick K. Dubois

Institut Interdisciplinaire D'innovation
Technologique,
Université de Sherbrooke,
3000 boul. de l'Université,
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada
e-mail: Patrick.K.Dubois@USherbrooke.ca

Jean-Sébastien Plante

Faculté de Genie,
Université de Sherbrooke,
2500 boul. de l'Université,
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
e-mail: Jean-Sebastien.Plante@USherbrooke.ca

François Charron

Faculté de Génie,
Université de Sherbrooke,
2500 boul. de l'Université,
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
e-mail: Francois.R.Charron@USherbrooke.ca

Mathieu Picard

Faculté de Génie,
Université de Sherbrooke,
3000 boul. de l'Université,
Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada
e-mail: Mathieu.Picard@USherbrooke.ca

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received October 6, 2017; final manuscript received July 2, 2018; published online August 13, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Patrick S. Keogh.

J. Vib. Acoust 141(1), 011007 (Aug 13, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: VIB-17-1439; doi: 10.1115/1.4040807 History: Received October 06, 2017; Revised July 02, 2018

This paper presents a new flexible hub design for the inside-out ceramic turbine (ICT) rotor configuration. This configuration is used in microturbines to integrate ceramic blades in order to increase turbine inlet temperature (TIT), which leads to higher cycle efficiency values. The ICT uses an outer composite rim to load the ceramic blades in compression by converting the centrifugal loads of the blades into hoop stresses in the composite rim. High stresses in the composite rim lead to high radial displacement of the blades. This displacement is compensated by using flexible hub in order to maintain the contact with the blades. However, hub flexibility can lead to rotordynamic problems as heavy hub deformation will induce high stresses in it. Thus, stresses in the hub are induced by both rotordynamics and centrifugation, requiring a multi-objective design process, which has yielded geometries that limited, until now, the blade tip speed to 358 m/s. In this paper, a simplified rotordynamics finite element model of a flexible hub is developed to allow quick design iterations. Using the model, a design space exploration of this hub concept is done while considering centrifugation and rotordynamics. Experimental validation is conducted on a simplified ICT prototype up to 129 krpm, i.e., an equivalent blade tip speed of 390 m/s. Finally, predictions from the experimentally calibrated model show that the tested prototype hub could reach a blade tip speed of 680 m/s.

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References

McDonald, C. F. , and Rodgers, C. , 2005, “Ceramic Recuperator and Turbine: The Key to Achieving a 40 Percent Efficient Microturbine,” ASME Paper No. GT2005-68644.
Coty, P. J. , 1983, “Compression Structured Ceramic Turbine Rotor Concept,” Ceramics for High-Performance Applications III, E. M. Lenoe , R. N. Katz , and J. J. Burke , eds., Springer, New York, pp. 427–441.
Kochrad, N. , Courtois, N. , Charette, M. , Picard, B. , Landry-Blais, A. , David, R. , Plante, J.-S. , and Picard, M. , 2017, “System-Level Performance for Microturbines Using an Inside-out Ceramic Turbines,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 139(6), p. 062702. [CrossRef]
Courtois, N. , Ebacher, F. , Dubois, P. K. , Kochrad, N. , Landry, C. , Charette, M. , Landry-Blais, A. , Fréchette, L. , Plante, J.-S. , and Picard, M. , 2017, “Superalloy Cooling System for the Composite Rim of an Inside-out Ceramic Turbine,” ASME Paper No. GT2017-64007.
Stoffer, L. J. , 1979, “Novel Ceramic Turbine Rotor Concept,” Air Force Aero Population Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, Technical Report No. AFAPL-TR-79-2074. http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a078669.pdf
Kochendoerfer, R. , 2017, “Compression Loaded Ceramic Turbine Rotor,” AGARD Conference Proceedings, Vol. 276, pp. 22.1–22.19.
Landry, C. , Dubois, P. K. , Courtois, N. , Charron, F. , Picard, M. , and Plante, J.-S. , 2016, “Development of an Inside-out Ceramic Turbine,” ASME Paper No. GT2016-57041.
Landry, C. , Dubois, P. K. , Plante, J. S. , Charron, F. , and Picard, M. , 2017, “Rotordynamic of a Highly Flexible Hub for Inside-out Ceramic Turbine Application: Finite Element Modeling and Experimental Validation,” ASME J. Vib. Acoust., 140(1), p. 011013. [CrossRef]
Kim, S. J. , Hayat, K. , Nasir, S. U. , and Ha, S. K. , 2014, “Design and Fabrication of Hybrid Composite Hubs for a Multi-Rim Flywheel Energy Storage System,” Compos. Struct., 107, pp. 19–29. [CrossRef]
San Andres, L. , 2010, “Notes 13. Squeeze Film Dampers: Operation, Models and Technical Issues,” Texas A&M University Digital Libraries, College Station, TX.
San Andrés, L. , 2012, “Damping and Inertia Coefficients for Two Open Ends Squeeze Film Dampers With a Central Groove: Measurements and Predictions,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 134(10), p. 102506. [CrossRef]
Andres, L. S. , 2014, “Force Coefficients for a Large Clearance Open Ends Squeeze Film Damper With a Central Feed Groove: Experiments and Predictions,” Tribol. Int., 71, pp. 17–25. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 4

Flowchart of the methodology used to size the ICT hub, accounting for both centrifugal stresses and unbalance response

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Fig. 3

Cut view of a simplified prototype of an ICT

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Fig. 2

Proposed ICT geometry using a cantilever beam flexible hub with the indicated beam segments

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Fig. 1

Inside-out ceramic turbine [7]

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Fig. 5

Reference frames for a disk on a rotating flexible shaft

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Fig. 6

Inside-out ceramic turbine DOF used in the simplified rotordynamic model

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Fig. 8

Parameters shown in a 1/16th of the hub

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Fig. 11

Relative displacement between the hub and the composite rim according to the adjustment disk's mass

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Fig. 12

Maximum amplitudes for 0–150 krpm

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Fig. 13

Unbalance response of the composite rim comparing the simplified model to the complete 3D model results

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Fig. 7

Meshed ICT prototype geometry used to determine the stiffnesses

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Fig. 9

Unbalance response of the composite rim in a sweep from 0 to 200 krpm

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Fig. 10

Relative displacement between the hub and the composite rim throughout the 0–200 krpm sweep

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Fig. 18

Comparison of the experimental unbalance response with the best fitted model at the composite rim

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Fig. 19

Beam vibration-induced stress for the fitted model (MPa)

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Fig. 14

Beams maximum stress

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Fig. 16

Rotordynamics test bench

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Fig. 17

Experimental unbalance response measured at the Composite Rim

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Fig. 20

Von Mises stress at 225 krpm with a 0.4 mm preload (MPa)

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