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Technical Brief

A Method of Panel Flutter Suppression and Elimination for Aeroelastic Structures in Supersonic Airflow

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhi-Guang Song

Dynamics and Vibrations Group,
Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering,
Technische Universität Darmstadt,
Dolivostr. 15,
Darmstadt 64293, Germany

Tian-Zhi Yang, Peter Hagedorn

Dynamics and Vibrations Group,
Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering,
Technische Universität Darmstadt,
Dolivostr. 15,
Darmstadt 64293, Germany

Feng-Ming Li

College of Aerospace and Civil Engineering,
Harbin Engineering University,
Harbin 150001, China
e-mail: lifengming@hrbeu.edu.cn

Erasmo Carrera

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Politecnico di Torino,
Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,
Torino 10129, Italy

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received December 1, 2017; final manuscript received February 24, 2018; published online May 7, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Stefano Lenci.

J. Vib. Acoust 140(6), 064501 (May 07, 2018) (6 pages) Paper No: VIB-17-1524; doi: 10.1115/1.4039724 History: Received December 01, 2017; Revised February 24, 2018

In traditional active flutter control, piezoelectric materials are used to increase the stiffness of the aeroelastic structure by providing an active stiffness, and usually the active stiffness matrix is symmetric. That is to say that the active stiffness not only cannot offset the influence of the aerodynamic stiffness which is an asymmetric matrix, but also will affect the natural frequency of the structural system. In other words, by traditional active flutter control method, the flutter bound can just be moved backward but cannot be eliminated. In this investigation, a new active flutter control method which can suppress the flutter effectively and without affecting the natural frequency of the structural system is proposed by exerting active control forces on some discrete points of the structure. In the structural modeling, the Kirchhoff plate theory and supersonic piston theory are applied. From the numerical results, it can be noted that the present control method is effective on the flutter suppression, and the control effects will be better if more active control forces are exerted. After being controlled by the present control method, the natural frequency of the structure remains unchanged.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the 2D panel in supersonic airflow

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Fig. 2

Two cases of active control forces exerting: (a) case 1 and (b) case 2

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Fig. 3

Variations of natural frequency of the uncontrolled panel with: (a) nondimensional aerodynamic pressure and (b) freestream static pressure

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Fig. 4

Variations of natural frequency of the controlled panel with the aerodynamic pressure using different numbers of active control forces in case 1

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Fig. 5

Variations of constant ξ with the aerodynamic pressure using different numbers of active control forces in case 1

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Fig. 6

Variations of natural frequency of the controlled panel with the aerodynamic pressure using different numbers of longitudinal active control forces in case 2

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Fig. 7

Controlled flutter bound by the piezoelectric materials

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Fig. 8

Variations of natural frequency of the uncontrolled cantilevered panel with the aerodynamic pressure

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Fig. 9

(a) Variations of natural frequency of the controlled cantilevered panel with the aerodynamic pressure using different numbers of active control forces and (b) variation of constant ξ

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