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Research Papers

Analytical Modeling of the Vibro-Acoustic Response of a Double-Walled Cylindrical Shell With Microperforation Excited by Turbulent Boundary Layer Pressure Fluctuations

[+] Author and Article Information
Qunlin Zhang

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi’an Jiaotong University,
Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: qlzhang.phd@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

Yijun Mao

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi’an Jiaotong University,
Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: maoyijun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Datong Qi

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi’an Jiaotong University,
Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: dtqi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received April 26, 2017; final manuscript received September 12, 2017; published online October 20, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Miao Yu.

J. Vib. Acoust 140(2), 021012 (Oct 20, 2017) (13 pages) Paper No: VIB-17-1175; doi: 10.1115/1.4038035 History: Received April 26, 2017; Revised September 12, 2017

An analytical model is developed to investigate the vibro-acoustic response of a double-walled cylindrical shell with the inner wall perforated when excited by the external turbulent boundary layer (TBL) pressure fluctuations. The shell motion is governed by the Donnell’s thin shell theory, and the mean particle velocity model is employed to describe the boundary condition between the microperforated shell and fluid media. Numerical results indicate that the transmission loss (TL) for the configuration of microperforating the inner wall could be larger than that for the conventional solid double-walled cylindrical shell with and without the core of porous material over a wide frequency range. Comparison between TL results with excitations from the TBL and the acoustic diffuse field (ADF) shows that with the thought of microperforating the inner shell, to reduce the acoustical excitation will be of more importance than the flow excitation over the ring frequency for a quiet interior space. Parametric studies illustrate that the perforation ratio is the main factor affecting the sound insulation performance through the total reactance.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch of the double-walled cylindrical shell system

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Fig. 2

Side view of the sound transmission through the double-walled perforated cylindrical shell

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Fig. 3

Iterative algorithm to get a converged solution of TL

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Fig. 4

TLs with different values of e0 for the SP configuration

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Fig. 5

Variation of the maximum mode number M with frequency for the SP configuration

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the one-third octave PSD of the shell velocity

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Fig. 7

Comparison of the one-third octave PSD of the acoustic pressure radiated by the shell

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Fig. 8

TLs with different configurations excited by external TBL pressure fluctuations

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Fig. 9

PSDs of the kinetic energy of the inner shell with the UU configuration by Zhou et al. [18] and the SP configuration

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Fig. 10

TLs with external and internal TBL excitations when microperforating the shell in the transmission side

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Fig. 11

TLs for the SP configuration in excitation of the TBL pressure fluctuation and the ADF

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Fig. 12

TLs for the SP configuration with different aperture diameters given the perforation ratio σ=1%

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Fig. 13

TLs for the SP configuration with different perforation ratios given the aperture diameter d=0.5 mm

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Fig. 14

The impedance constant of the inner perforated shell: (a) with different aperture diameters and a fixed perforation ratio σ=1% and (b) with different perforation ratios and a fixed aperture diameter d=0.5 mm

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Fig. 15

The total impedance of the inner perforated shell: (a) with different aperture diameters and a fixed perforation ratio σ=1% and (b) with different perforation ratios and a fixed aperture diameter d=0.5 mm

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