0
research-article

Sound-Induced Motion of a Nano-Scale Fiber

[+] Author and Article Information
Ronald N. Miles

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
miles@binghamton.edu

Jian Zhou

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
jzhou41@binghamton.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037511 History: Received July 16, 2016; Revised July 10, 2017

Abstract

An analysis is presented of the motion of a thin fiber, supported on each end, due to a sound wave that propagates in the direction perpendicular to its long axis. Predicted and measured results indicate that when fibers or hairs having a diameter measurably less than one micron are subjected to acoustic excitation, their motion can be a very reasonable approximation to that of the acoustic particle motion at frequencies spanning the audible range. When their diameter is reduced to the sub-micron range, the results presented here suggest that forces associated with mechanical behavior, such as bending stiffness, material density, and axial loads, can be dominated by fluid forces associated with fluid viscosity. Resonant behavior due to reflections from the supports tends to be heavily damped so that the details of the boundary conditions do not play a significant role in determining the overall system response. Thin fibers are thus constrained to simply move with the surrounding viscous fluid. The results presented here suggest that if the diameter or radius is chosen to be sufficiently small, incorporating a suitable transduction scheme to convert its mechanical motion into an electronic signal could lead to a sound sensor that very closely depicts the acoustic particle motion over a wide range of frequencies.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In