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Research Papers

Passive Control of Piston Secondary Motion Using Nonlinear Energy Absorbers

[+] Author and Article Information
N. Dolatabadi

Wolfson School of Mechanical,
Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering,
Loughborough University,
Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
e-mail: N.Dolatabadi@lboro.ac.uk

S. Theodossiades

Professor
Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical
and Manufacturing Engineering,
Loughborough University,
Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
e-mail: S.Theodossiades@lboro.ac.uk

S. J. Rothberg

Professor
Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical
and Manufacturing Engineering,
Loughborough University,
Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
e-mail: S.J.Rothberg@lboro.ac.uk

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received September 19, 2016; final manuscript received March 27, 2017; published online June 28, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Jeffrey F. Rhoads.

J. Vib. Acoust 139(5), 051009 (Jun 28, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: VIB-16-1462; doi: 10.1115/1.4036468 History: Received September 19, 2016; Revised March 27, 2017

The impulsive behavior of the piston in the cylinder liner plays a key role in the noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) of internal combustion engines. There have been several studies on the identification and quantification of piston impact action under various operation conditions. In the current study, the dynamics of the piston secondary motion are initially explored in order to describe the aggressive oscillations, energy loss, and noise generation. The control of piston secondary motion (and thus, impacts) is investigated using a new passive approach based on energy transfer of the highly transient oscillations to a nonlinear absorber. The effectiveness of this new method for improving the piston impact behavior is discussed using a preliminary parametric study that leads to the conceptual design of a nonlinear energy absorber.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Topics: Pistons , Engines
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The generic mechanism of passive TET through nonlinear energy sink (NES) [47]

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Fig. 2

Structure/lubricant property arrangements for the piston dynamics model

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Fig. 3

Piston assembly and its geometric parameters

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Fig. 4

Piston model validated against a dry contact model by Offner et al. [24]: (a) top and (b) bottom lands of the piston skirt (eccentricity displacements et and eb (with respect to the cylinder centerline), antithrust side clearances Ct,ATS and Cb,ATS [24] and thrust-side clearances Ct,TS and Cb,TS [24])

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Fig. 5

Fast Fourier transform spectra of the piston secondary motions: translation (ep) and rotation about the piston pin (β)

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Fig. 6

Single pendulum nonlinear energy absorber coupled with the piston assembly

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Fig. 7

Free body diagrams of the piston and pin, including the absorber reactions

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Fig. 8

Free body diagram of the pendulum absorber (with left diagram showing external excitations and right diagram depicting the inertial forces)

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Fig. 9

Engine speed variations during one engine cycle for different engine speeds

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Fig. 10

Percentage of variation in eccentricity acceleration amplitudes (impact severity) with absorber stiffness coefficient and engine speed

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Fig. 11

Percentage of variation of eccentricity acceleration amplitudes (impact severity) with absorber damping coefficient and engine speed

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Fig. 12

Percentage of variation of eccentricity acceleration amplitudes (impact severity) with absorber damping and stiffness coefficients

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Fig. 13

Percentage of variation of impact number with absorber damping and stiffness coefficients

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Fig. 14

Percentage of variation of energy transfer with absorber damping and stiffness coefficients

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Fig. 15

Pendulum absorber hysteresis loop

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Fig. 16

Eccentricity accelerations at the top and bottom of the piston skirt

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Fig. 17

Eccentricity displacements at the top and bottom of the piston skirt

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Fig. 18

Piston secondary motions (translation and rotation) and angular oscillations of pendulum

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Fig. 19

Frequency spectrum of the piston secondary motions and pendulum angular oscillations for 3500 rpm engine speed

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