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Research Papers

Design and Experimental Analysis of Origami-Inspired Vibration Isolator With Quasi-Zero-Stiffness Characteristic

[+] Author and Article Information
Sachiko Ishida

Senior Assistant Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
School of Science and Technology,
Meiji University,
1-1-1, Higashimita,
Kawasaki, Kanagawa 2148571, Japan
e-mail: sishida@meiji.ac.jp

Kohki Suzuki

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Graduate School of Science and Technology,
Meiji University,
1-1-1, Higashimita,
Kawasaki, Kanagawa 2148571, Japan

Haruo Shimosaka

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
School of Science and Technology,
Meiji University,
1-1-1, Higashimita,
Kawasaki, Kanagawa 2148571, Japan
e-mail: hshimos@meiji.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received July 20, 2016; final manuscript received March 16, 2017; published online June 12, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ronald N. Miles.

J. Vib. Acoust 139(5), 051004 (Jun 12, 2017) (5 pages) Paper No: VIB-16-1357; doi: 10.1115/1.4036465 History: Received July 20, 2016; Revised March 16, 2017

We present a prototype vibration isolator whose design is inspired by origami-based foldable cylinders with torsional buckling patterns. The vibration isolator works as a nonlinear spring that has quasi-zero spring stiffness in a given frequency region, where it does not transmit vibration in theory. We evaluate the performance of the prototype vibration isolator through excitation experiments via the use of harmonic oscillations and seismic-wave simulations of the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean and Kobe earthquakes. The results indicate that the isolator with the current specification is able to suppress the transmission of vibrations with frequencies of over 6 Hz. The functionality and constraints of the isolator are also clarified. It has been known that origami-based foldable cylinders with torsional buckling patterns provide bistable folding motions under given conditions. In a previous study, we proposed a vibration isolator utilizing the bistability characteristics and numerically confirmed the device's validity as a vibration isolator. Here, we attempt prototyping the isolator with the use of versatile metallic components and experimentally evaluate the isolation performance.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Cylindrical foldable structure with torsional buckling pattern [26]

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the proposed isolator. (a) Original computational model in which multiple elements are connected at a single joint. (b) Simplified model in which the horizontal elements are replaced with rigid rings, and the positions of the longitudinal and diagonal elements are shifted by a constant phase so that the elements are one-to-one connected [27].

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Fig. 3

Photograph of prototype vibration isolator with central spring (side view). The compression and tension springs correspond to the longitudinal and diagonal elements, respectively.

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Fig. 4

Photographs of the prototype vibration isolator without the central spring. (a) Folded and (b) deployed states from the side view along with the tension machine. (c) Folded and (d) deployed states of the isolator from the top view after its removal from the tension machine.

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Fig. 5

Load–height diagram of the prototype vibration isolator without the central spring at folding/deploying speeds of 10 mm/min, 50 mm/min, and 100 mm/min

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Fig. 6

Load–height diagram of the prototype vibration isolator with the central spring at folding/deploying speeds of 10 mm/min, 50 mm/min, and 100 mm/min. Load–height diagrams for height ranges of (a) 75–100 mm and (b) 75–85 mm.

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Fig. 7

Overview of vibration system for excitation experiment

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Fig. 8

Transmissibility of the isolator for vibrating-table acceleration amplitudes of |u| = 0.1, 0.7, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 m/s2

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Fig. 9

z-dimensional seismic waves of the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean earthquake simulated via the vibrating table along with the response waves of the prototype isolator

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Fig. 10

z-dimensional seismic waves of the Kobe earthquake simulated via the vibrating table along with response waves of the prototype isolator

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