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research-article

Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Vortex-induced Vibration of a Flexible Hydrofoil

[+] Author and Article Information
Abe H. Lee

Graduate Program in Acoustics Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
abelee5084@gmail.com

Robert L. Campbell

Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 16802Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
rlc138@arl.psu.edu

Brent A. Craven

Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 16802Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
brent.craven@fda.hhs.gov

Stephen A. Hambric

Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
sah19@arl.psu.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036453 History: Received December 13, 2015; Revised April 05, 2017

Abstract

Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is investigated in this study for vortex-induced vibration of a flexible, backward skewed hydrofoil. An in-house finite-element structural solver FEANL is tightly coupled with the open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) library OpenFOAM to simulate the interaction of a flexible hydrofoil with vortical flow structures shed from a large upstream rigid cylinder. To simulate the turbulent flow at a moderate computational cost, hybrid RANS-LES is used. Simulations are first performed to investigate key modeling aspects that include the influence of CFD mesh resolution and topology (structured vs unstructured mesh), time step size, and turbulence model (Delayed-Detached-Eddy-Simulation and k-omega SST-SAS). Final FSI simulations are then performed and compared against experimental data acquired from the Penn State-ARL 12-inch water tunnel at two flow conditions, 2.5 m/s and 3.0 m/s, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 153,000 and 184,000 (based on the cylinder diameter), respectively. Comparisons of the hydrofoil tip-deflections, reaction forces and velocity fields (contours and profiles) show reasonable agreement between the tightly-coupled FSI simulations and experiments. The primary motivation of this study is to assess the capability of a tightly coupled FSI approach to model such a problem and to provide modeling guidance for future FSI simulations of rotating propellers in crashback (reverse propeller operation).

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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