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Research Papers

Metastructure With Piezoelectric Element for Simultaneous Vibration Suppression and Energy Harvesting

[+] Author and Article Information
Guobiao Hu, Arnab Banerjee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Auckland,
Auckland 1010, New Zealand

Lihua Tang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Auckland,
Auckland 1010, New Zealand
e-mail: l.tang@auckland.ac.nz

Raj Das

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Auckland,
Auckland 1010, New Zealand;
Sir Lawrence Wackett Aerospace Research Centre,
School of Engineering,
RMIT University,
Melbourne 3001, Australia

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received March 23, 2016; final manuscript received August 31, 2016; published online November 23, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Michael Leamy.

J. Vib. Acoust 139(1), 011012 (Nov 23, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: VIB-16-1142; doi: 10.1115/1.4034770 History: Received March 23, 2016; Revised August 31, 2016

Inspired by the mechanism of acoustic–elastic metamaterial (AEMM) that exhibits a stop band gap for wave transmission, simultaneous vibration suppression and energy harvesting can be achieved by integrating AEMM with energy-harvesting component. This article presents an analytical study of a multifunctional system based on this concept. First, a mathematical model of a unit-cell AEMM embedded with a piezoelectric transducer is developed and analyzed. The most important finding is the double-valley phenomenon that can intensively widen the band gap under strong electromechanical coupling condition. Based on the mathematical model, a dimensionless parametric study is conducted to investigate how to tune the system to enhance its vibration suppression ability. Subsequently, a multicell system is conceptualized from the findings of the unit-cell system. In a similar way, dimensionless parametric studies are conducted to optimize the vibration suppression performance and the energy-harvesting performance severally. It turns out that different impedance matching schemes are required to achieve optimal vibration suppression and energy harvesting. To handle this problem, compromising solutions are proposed for weakly and strongly coupled systems, respectively. Finally, the characteristics of the AEMM-based piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) from two functional aspects are summarized, providing several design guidelines in terms of system parameter tuning. It is concluded that certain tradeoff is required in the process of optimizing the performance toward dual functionalities.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Unit-cell AEMM-based PEH

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Fig. 2

(a) k2′/k2 and c2′/c2 versus r and (b) optimal transmittance (impedance matching is achieved at each frequency) versus Ω for different ke

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Fig. 3

(a) Optimal transmittance versus μ and Ω and (b) optimal transmittance versus Ω for different α

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Fig. 4

Optimal transmittance versus Ω for (a) different ζ1 (ζ2=0.004) and (b) different ζ2 (ζ1=0.02)

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Fig. 5

Multicell AEMM-based PEH

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Fig. 6

Optimal transmittance versus Ω for different ke : (a) n=3 and (b) n=8

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Fig. 7

Optimal transmittance versus Ω for (a) different μ and (b) different α

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Fig. 8

Optimal transmittance versus Ω for (a) different ζ1 (ζ2=0.004) and (b) different ζ2 (ζ1=0.02)

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Fig. 9

Dimensionless optimal power versus Ω for (a) different μ and (b) different α

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Fig. 10

Dimensionless optimal power versus Ω for (a) different ζ1 (ζ2=0.004) and (b) different ζ2 (ζ1=0.02)

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Fig. 11

Comparison of optimal r catering to energy harvesting and vibration suppression, respectively: (a) ke=0.02 and (b) ke=0.4

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Fig. 12

(a) Band gap pattern (ke=0.02), (b) dimensionless optimal power response (ke=0.02), (c) band gap pattern (ke=0.4), and (d) dimensionless optimal power response (ke=0.4)

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