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Technical Brief

Vibration Suppression Effect in a Bending-Levitated Flexible Steel Plate by the Electromagnetic Force

[+] Author and Article Information
Hideaki Kato

Department of Prime Mover Engineering,
Tokai University,
4-1-1 Kitakaname,
Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken 259-1292, Japan
e-mail: hkato@tokai-u.jp

Hiroki Marumori

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tokai University,
4-1-1 Kitakaname,
Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken 259-1292, Japan
e-mail: marumori@star.tokai-u.jp

Hikaru Yonezawa

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tokai University,
4-1-1 Kitakaname,
Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken 259-1292, Japan
e-mail: h.yonezawa@fuji.tokai-u.jp

Takayoshi Narita

Department of Prime Mover Engineering,
Tokai University,
4-1-1 Kitakaname,
Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken 259-1292, Japan
e-mail: narita@tsc.u-tokai.ac.jp

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received May 8, 2015; final manuscript received May 25, 2016; published online July 19, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Paul C.-P. Chao.

J. Vib. Acoust 138(5), 054502 (Jul 19, 2016) (5 pages) Paper No: VIB-15-1159; doi: 10.1115/1.4033981 History: Received May 08, 2015; Revised May 25, 2016

We have proposed a method of levitating a thin steel plate by moderately bending it beforehand. To elucidate the bending levitation performance, an ultrathin steel plate was levitated; the relationship among the tilt angle of the electromagnets, the standard deviation of the displacement, and the levitation probability was evaluated. Furthermore, to elucidate the effective tilt angle of the electromagnets for bending, the steel plate shape was analyzed using the finite difference method (FDM). When levitating the thin steel plate at the optimal tilt angle of the electromagnets attained by the FDM, a desirable levitation performance was achieved robustly.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Electromagnetic levitation control system

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Fig. 2

Schematic illustration of experimental apparatus

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Fig. 3

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and evaluation value j

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Fig. 4

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and standard deviation of displacement

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Fig. 5

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and standard deviation of displacement for different feedback gains

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Fig. 6

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and levitation probability for different feedback gains

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Fig. 7

Time histories and power spectra of current when inputting the random disturbance: (a) 5% random disturbance and (b) 10% random disturbance

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Fig. 8

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and standard deviation of displacement when inputting the random disturbance

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Fig. 9

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and levitation probability when inputting the random disturbance

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Fig. 10

Time histories of displacement (amplitude of step response = 1 mm): (a) θ = 0 deg and (b) θ = 15 deg

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Fig. 11

Relationship between the tilt angle θ of the electromagnets and levitation probability when inputting the step disturbance

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