0
Research Papers

Suppression of Lateral and Torsional Stick–Slip Vibrations of Drillstrings With Impact and Torsional Dampers

[+] Author and Article Information
Lingnan Hu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
3123 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843
e-mail: lingnan@tamu.edu

Alan Palazzolo

TEES Professor
Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
3123 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843
e-mail: a-palazzolo@tamu.edu

Mansour Karkoub

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University at Qatar,
Doha 23874, Qatar
e-mail: mansour.karkoub@qatar.tamu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received December 16, 2015; final manuscript received May 11, 2016; published online June 17, 2016. Assoc. Editor: John Yu.

J. Vib. Acoust 138(5), 051013 (Jun 17, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: VIB-15-1527; doi: 10.1115/1.4033640 History: Received December 16, 2015; Revised May 11, 2016

Violent drillstring vibrations in a well should be suppressed to prevent premature failure of the drillstring parts and borehole wall and enhance the drilling process. This paper presents novel centralized impact dampers and torsional vibration dampers for lateral and torsional stick–slip vibration suppression which will function well in the harsh environment in the well due to their all-metal construction. A drillstring vibration model is used in this paper to simulate coupled lateral and torsional vibrations of the drillstring with impact and torsional dampers installed in the drill collar (DC). The high-fidelity model utilizes Timoshenko beam finite elements (FEs) and includes stress-stiffening effects to account for the gravity and axial loading effect on the transverse string stiffness. The rotational motions of the impactors result from dry friction tangential contact forces that occur when they contact the DC or sub. The tangential forces utilize a nonlinear Hertzian contact restoring force and a nonlinear, viscous contact damping force, in place of the typical coefficient of restitution (COR) model that cannot provide the required normal and tangential contact forces. The primary conclusions drawn from the simulation results are: (1) both the lateral vibration of the drillstring that is close to the bending critical speeds and the vibration induced by destabilizing forces can be suppressed by impact dampers and (2) the torsional stick–slip motion of the drillstring can be mitigated by the torsional damper.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Drilling rig (left) and cross section of the drillstring (right) with impact dampers and a torsional damper

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Cross section of the impact damper and DC at moment of impact

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Planar impacting model for impactor–DC collision

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Coulomb torque model: sliding torque Tsld and static torque Tstt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Stribeck torque model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Mode shape of the drillstring at the bending critical speed of Ω=119  rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Displacement and velocity of the DC at point B without (left) or with (right) impactors with d=10 mm and the total impactor mass of 286 kg in the ROB condition at the critical speed of Ω=119 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Displacement and velocity of the DC at point C without (left) or with (right) impactors with d=10 mm and the total impactor mass of 286 kg in the ROB condition at the critical speed of Ω=119  rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Displacement and velocity of the DC at point B (left) and point C (right) with d=10 mm and the total impactor mass of 143  kg under impacting in the ROB condition at the critical speed of Ω=117 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Velocity of the impactor with respect to the DC at point C with d=10 mm and the total impactor mass of 286 kg (left) at the critical speed of Ω=119 rpm or 143 kg (right) at the critical speed of Ω=117 rpm under impacting in the ROB condition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Displacement of the DC at point B (top) and point C (bottom) with d=20 mm (left) or d=30 mm (right) and the total impactor mass of 286  kg under impacting in the ROB condition at the critical speed of Ω=119 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Orbit of the relative displacement of the impactor with respect to the DC (top) and collision state (1 represents collision and 0 no collision) between the impactor and the DC (bottom) at point C with d=20 mm (left) or d=30 mm (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Displacement of the DC (top), collision state (1 represents collision and 0 no collision) between the impactor and DC (middle), and velocity of the impactor with respect to the DC (bottom) at point C with d=10 mm (left) or d=20 mm (right) and the total impactor mass of 286 kg in the ROB condition at the critical speed of Ω=119 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Mode shape of the drillstring at the bending critical speed of Ω=91 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Rotary speed of the DB, lateral displacement and velocity of the DC at point D utilizing the Coulomb torque model without (left) or with (right) the impactors and torsional damper under d=10 mm, and the even mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=91 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Rotary speed of the DB, lateral displacement and velocity of the DC at point D utilizing the Coulomb torque model with the impactors and torsional damper under d=10 mm, and the mode-oriented mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=91 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Rotary speed of the DB, lateral displacement and velocity of the DC at point D utilizing the Stribeck torque model without (left) or with (right) the impactors and torsional damper under d=20 mm, and the mode-oriented mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=91 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Rotary speed of the DB and lateral displacement of the DC at point D utilizing the Coulomb torque model with the impactors and torsional damper under d=10 mm, μA=0.35, and the even mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=91 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Rotary speed of the DB and lateral displacement of the DC at point D utilizing the Stribeck torque model with the impactors and torsional damper under d=20 mm, μA=0.35, and the mode-oriented mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=91 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Rotary speed of the DB utilizing the Coulomb torque model without (left) or with (right) the impactors and torsional damper in the DA condition in the first torsional mode of the drillstring under 30 kN WOB in the first torsional mode at the critical speed of Ω=34 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Rotary speed of the DB utilizing the Stribeck torque model without (left) or with (right) the impactors and torsional damper in the DA condition in the first torsional mode of the drillstring under 3 kN WOB in the first torsional mode at the critical speed of Ω=34 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 22

Rotary speed of the DB and lateral displacement of the DC at point D utilizing the Coulomb torque model without (left) or with (right) the impactors and torsional damper, with cross-coupled stiffness, d=20 mm and the mode-oriented mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=93 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 23

Rotary speed of the DB and lateral displacement of the DC at point D utilizing the Stribeck torque model without (left) or with (right) the impactors and torsional damper, with cross-coupled stiffness, d=20 mm and the mode-oriented mass distribution of the impactors in the DA condition at the critical speed of Ω=93 rpm

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In