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Research Papers

Passive Vibration Control Based on Embedded Acoustic Black Holes

[+] Author and Article Information
Liuxian Zhao

Department of Aerospace and
Mechanical Engineering,
University of Notre Dame,
Notre Dame, IN 46556
e-mail: lzhao2@nd.edu

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received July 23, 2014; final manuscript received March 17, 2016; published online May 4, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Nader Jalili.

J. Vib. Acoust 138(4), 041002 (May 04, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1265; doi: 10.1115/1.4033263 History: Received July 23, 2014; Revised March 17, 2016

This paper uses finite element method to simulate the passive vibration control which is able to improve the overall performance and the operational bandwidth. The vibration control is based on dynamic structural tailoring achieved via acoustic black holes (ABH) with the local thickness varying according to power-law profile. The ABH is a passive technique which uses properties of wave propagation in structures with gradual decrease of thickness that leads to the decrease of phase and group velocities of flexural waves, which makes the ABH has the ability to reduce the structural vibrations after the wave pass through the ABH. However, because real manufacturing cannot develop ABH with zero residual thickness, this nonzero residual thickness will induce the corresponding reflection coefficients are far from zero. In this paper, two types of damping mechanism are attached to the surface of plate: (1) damping layers and (2) coupled electro–mechanical system in order to reduce the structure vibrations. The effects of different number of ABHs, different thickness of damping layers, and different configurations of electrical circuitry are also explored. In this study, the performances of ABH-based passive and semipassive vibration control are explored using numerical simulations of a two-dimensional plate with embedded ABHs. Results show that the ABH based design can enhance the performance of vibration control under steady-state response.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of a two-dimensional (2D) plate with an embedded taper having power-law profile and nonzero residual thickness h1

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Fig. 2

Wave propagation characteristics on tapered plate. (a) Schematic model for tapered plate, (b) time–space analysis for tapered plate, and (c) frequency-wavenumber analysis for tapered plate.

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Fig. 3

Numerical results showing the vibration control using visco-elastic material in combination with one ABH taper. (a) Schematic model for tapered plate with viscotape, (b) steady-state response of acceleration under different thicknesses of viscotape, and (c) steady-state response of acceleration with different profile of ABHs.

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Fig. 4

Numerical results showing the vibration control using visco-elastic material in combination with five ABH tapers. (a) Schematic models for tapered plate with viscotape, (b) steady-state response of acceleration under different thickness of viscotape, and (c) steady-state response of acceleration with different profile of ABHs.

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Fig. 5

Numerical results showing the vibration control using shunted lead zirconate titanate (PZT) in combination with one ABH taper. (a) Schematic models for tapered plate with shunted PZT, (b) steady-state response of acceleration under different values of resistor, and (c) steady-state response of acceleration with different profile of ABHs.

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Fig. 6

Numerical results showing the vibration control using shunted PZT in combination with five ABH tapers. (a) Schematic models for tapered plate with shunted PZT, (b) steady-state response of acceleration under different values of resistor, and (c) steady-state response of acceleration with different profile of ABHs.

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