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Research Papers

Shock-Based Experimental Investigation of the Linear Particle Chain Impact Damper

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohamed Gharib

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University at Qatar,
Education City,
Doha 23874, Qatar
e-mail: mohamed.gharib@qatar.tamu.edu

Mansour Karkoub

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University at Qatar,
Education City,
Doha 23874, Qatar
e-mail: masnour.karkoub@qatar.tamu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received May 7, 2014; final manuscript received June 2, 2015; published online October 6, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Corina Sandu.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(6), 061012 (Oct 06, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1169; doi: 10.1115/1.4031406 History: Received May 07, 2014; Revised June 02, 2015

Impact dampers (IDs) provide an effective, economical, and retrofittable solution to the vibration problem in several engineering applications. An ID typically consists of a single or multiple masses constrained between two or more stops and attached to a primary system to be controlled. The latest developed type in the IDs family is the linear particle chain (LPC) ID. It consists of a linear arrangement of two sizes of freely moving masses, constrained by two stops. The high number of impacts among the damper masses leads to rapid energy dissipation compared to the common IDs. This paper presents an experimental study on the effectiveness of the LPC ID in reducing the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) frame structure under different shock excitations. Prototypes of the LPC and conventional IDs with different geometric parameters are fabricated. The structure is excited by either an impact at the top floor or pulses at its base. The damping effect of the LPC ID is compared with that of conventional IDs. The experimental outcomes clearly show that the LPC ID can effectively reduce the response of simple structures under shock excitation. Additional investigations are conducted to examine the LPC ID sensitivity to the main damper parameters, such as the chain length, damper mass ratio, and damper clearance.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Displacement time response of an SDOF system with LPC ID showing the number of impacts among the damper masses [20]

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Fig. 3

The LPC ID prototype

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Fig. 4

The small holder in the LPC ID

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Fig. 5

The one story frame structure components and prototype

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Fig. 6

Geometric parameters of the LPC ID

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Fig. 7

The experiment setup with shock excitation at the top floor

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Fig. 8

Single-unit (1L0S) and LPC (2L1S) IDs prototypes

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Fig. 9

Displacement response of the top floor of the primary system without damper (0L0S) and with single-unit ID (1L0S, d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in.): (a) time response and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 10

Displacement response of top floor of the primary system without damper (0L0S) and with LPC ID (2L1S, d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in., DS=0.25 in.): (a) time response and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 11

LPC ID with 5L4S arrangement

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Fig. 12

Effect of chain length on the LPC ID performance (d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in., DS=0.25 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 13

Effect of chain length on the LPC ID performance (d=250 mm, DL=1.5 in., DS=0.50 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 15

Displacement time response of the undamped top and bottom floors of the primary system with: (a) one pulse at the base and (b) two sequential pulses at the base

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Fig. 16

Comparison between the effect of single-unit and 2L1S LPC IDs under base excitation: (a) single-unit ID (1L0S, d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in.) and (b) LPC ID (2L1S, d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in., DS=0.25 in.)

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Fig. 17

Multi-unit ID with four balls (4L0S)

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Fig. 18

Comparison between the effect of multi-unit and 2L1S LPC IDs (d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in., DS=0.25 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 19

Comparison between the effect of multi-unit and 3L2S LPC IDs (d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in., DS=0.25 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 20

Spherical balls and holders with various mass ratios

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Fig. 21

Effect of mass ratio on the 2L1S LPC ID performance (d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 22

Effect of mass ratio on the 3L2S LPC ID performance (d=200 mm, DL=1.5 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 23

LPC IDs prototypes with various clearances

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Fig. 24

Effect of clearance on the 2L1S LPC ID performance (DL=1.5 in., DS=0.5 in.): (a) decay rate and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 25

Effect of clearance on the 3L2S LPC ID performance (DL=1.5 in., DS=0.5 in.): (a) time response and (b) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 14

The experiment setup with impulse excitation at the base

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