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Research Papers

A Model Updating Technique Based on the Constitutive Relation Error for In Situ Identification of Admittance Coefficient of Sound Absorbing Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
Aurélie Progneaux

Building, Architecture and
Town Planning Department,
Université Libre de Bruxelles,
Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 CP 194/02,
Bruxelles 1050, Belgium
e-mail: aprognea@ulb.ac.be

Philippe Bouillard

Professor
Building, Architecture
and Town Planning Department,
Université Libre de Bruxelles,
Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 CP 194/02,
Bruxelles 1050, Belgium
School of Engineering,
Nazarbayev University,
Kabanbay Batyr Avenue 53,
Astana 010000, Kazakhstan
e-mail: philippe.bouillard@ulb.ac.be

Arnaud Deraemaeker

Professor
Building, Architecture
and Town Planning Department,
Université Libre de Bruxelles,
Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 CP 194/02,
Bruxelles 1050, Belgium
e-mail: aderaema@ulb.ac.be

For i = 1,...,Nsens and j=1,...,Ntot (Nsens is the number of sensors, and Ntot is the number of degrees-of-freedom).

The value of the measurements is multiplied by (1-β), with β=50%, at each frequency.

All the estimators are computed on the frequency range.

Contributed by the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received January 30, 2014; final manuscript received May 18, 2015; published online June 15, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Lonny Thompson.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(5), 051013 (Oct 01, 2015) (14 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1031; doi: 10.1115/1.4030662 History: Received January 30, 2014; Revised May 18, 2015; Online June 15, 2015

The development of new absorbing materials and the description of their acoustical properties take an important place in the current acoustical researches. This paper focuses on the identification of the admittance coefficient of sound absorbing material from in situ measurements, using the constitutive relation error (CRE)-based updating technique. This technique consists of a two-stage approach, allowing to regularize the inverse problem. Moreover, the technique allows the detection of faulty sensors and therefore the correction of the erroneous measurements before the updating process. The technique is developed, in a first part of this paper, for acoustical problems with generalized boundary conditions, and illustrated, in a second part, on a numerical and a physical two-dimensional (2D) test case.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Acoustical problem

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Fig. 2

Schema of a loudspeaker

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Fig. 4

Distribution of the local indicator: localization of defective sensors

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Fig. 5

Evolution of ξ and η as a function of the weighting parameter r for the initial value of the parameters

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Fig. 11

Pressure at the 28th node

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Fig. 6

An,1 versus frequency

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Fig. 7

An,2 versus frequency

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Fig. 8

An,3 versus frequency

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Fig. 9

An,4 versus frequency

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Fig. 10

v¯n,1 versus frequency

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Fig. 15

Mesh of the Kundt's tube

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Fig. 16

Measured pressure at x=0.105 m for the foam

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Fig. 17

Measured pressure at x=0.205 m for the foam

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Fig. 18

Measured pressure at x=0.105 m for the felt

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Fig. 19

Measured pressure at x=0.205 m for the felt

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Fig. 13

Admittance coefficient of the foam

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Fig. 14

Admittance coefficient of the felt

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Fig. 22

Measured transfer function for the foam

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Fig. 23

Measured transfer function for the felt

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Fig. 24

Admittance coefficient of the foam

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Fig. 25

Admittance coefficient of the felt

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Fig. 26

Pressure at x=0.105 m for the foam

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Fig. 27

Pressure at x=0.205 m for the foam

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Fig. 28

Pressure at x=0.105 m for the felt

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Fig. 29

Pressure at x=0.205 m for the felt

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Fig. 20

Normal component of the velocity for the foam

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Fig. 21

Normal component of the velocity for the felt

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