0
Research Papers

Study on Piston Slap Induced Liner Cavitation

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaoyu Wang

Mechanical Analysis Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Kyushu University,
Motooka 744, Nishiku,
Fukuoka 819-0382, Japan
e-mail: wang@qma.mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Kazuhide Ohta

Mechanical Analysis Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Kyushu University,
Motooka 744, Nishiku,
Fukuoka 819-0382, Japan
e-mail: kazuhide-ohta@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Contributed by the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received December 10, 2014; final manuscript received April 5, 2015; published online June 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Theodore Farabee.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(5), 051010 (Oct 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1466; doi: 10.1115/1.4030360 History: Received December 10, 2014; Revised April 05, 2015; Online June 02, 2015

Liner cavitation induced by piston slap in a diesel engine is caused by water pressure fluctuation when the pressure of coolant falls below saturated vapor pressure. Cavitation erosion of cylinder liners is thought to be generated by the impulsive pressure or jet flow impingement following the collapse of cavitation bubbles. In this study, a numerical method to predict the water pressure fluctuation in water coolant passage induced by piston slap impact force is developed. In complimentary impact vibration experiments, high frequency components of the water pressure fluctuation can be seen just after the pressure reaches the saturated vapor pressure level or less. These high frequency components seem to show the occurrence of cavitation. A finite element acoustic model of the water coolant passage in an actual engine block is created and its validity is confirmed by the acoustic vibration tests in air. Then, the coupled vibration characteristics of the water acoustic field and engine block structure are determined, and water pressure waveform induced by piston slap is predicted.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Analytical model of piston slap induced liner cavitation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Sound speed measurement

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Experiment setup of rectangular tank

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Measured and calculated natural frequencies and mode shapes of rectangular tank model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Analytical natural frequencies and mode shapes of acoustic field

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Measured and calculated acceleration and pressure response at Hw = 250 mm and Hp = 90 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Measured and calculated acceleration and pressure response at Hw = 350 mm and Hp = 90 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Measured and calculated first two mode shapes of pressure and acceleration at Hw = 350 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Measured and calculated first two resonance frequencies changing with water level

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Measured and calculated pressure waveform at Hw = 350 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Measured pressure waveforms with small and large impact force

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Coupled system of cylinder block and water coolant passage in air

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Experiment setup of cylinder block vibration test

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Measured and calculated structural vibration and acoustic pressure of the engine block (in air)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Calculated results of piston slap force

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Calculated results of piston slap induced liner vibration and water pressure

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In