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Research Papers

Damage Identification Based on the Proper Orthogonal Mode Energy Curvature

[+] Author and Article Information
Eun-Taik Lee

Department of Architectural Engineering,
Chung-Ang University,
Seoul 156-756, South Korea
e-mail: etlee@cau.ac.kr

Hee-Chang Eun

Department of Architectural Engineering,
Kangwon National University,
Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-701, South Korea
e-mail: heechang@kangwon.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received July 1, 2014; final manuscript received March 10, 2015; published online April 24, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Jeffrey F. Rhoads.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(4), 041018 (Aug 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1235; doi: 10.1115/1.4030043 History: Received July 01, 2014; Revised March 10, 2015; Online April 24, 2015

The evaluation of the structural performance and durability using only measurement data without any baseline data is practical. One measurement data type is the frequency response function (FRF) data set, which does not provide enough information about the health state because of the noise included in the data. Proper orthogonal modes (POMs) extracted from the FRF data in a prescribed frequency range are utilized as an index to recognize the existence of damage. The POMs represent the principal axes of inertia formed by the distribution of data on the modal coordinate curve. This work proposes a damage detection method to trace damage based on the POM energy curvature at the element of the finite element model. The validity of the proposed method is illustrated by a numerical experiment and an experimental test.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Receptance magnitude of noise free damage beam

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Fig. 1

A fixed-end beam structure model

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Fig. 7

FRF curves at nodes ⑥–⑩ due to an impact at node ⑪

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Fig. 8

Test results of damaged beam: (a) POM corresponding to the first POV, (b) POM corresponding to the second POV, and (c) POM energy curvature at test 1

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Fig. 3

Numerical results of damaged beam extracted from the FRF data in the first resonance frequency range: (a) POM curves corresponding to the first three POVs, (b) POM energy curves corresponding to the first three POVs, (c) POM energy curvature corresponding to the first POV, (d) POM energy curvature corresponding to the second POV, and (e) POM energy curvature corresponding to the third POV

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Fig. 4

POM and POM energy curves: (a) POM curves corresponding the second FRF resonance frequency, (b) POM energy curves corresponding to the second FRF resonance frequency, (c) POM curves corresponding the third FRF resonance frequency, and (d) POM energy curves corresponding to the third FRF resonance frequency

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Fig. 5

POM energy curvature extracted from the FRF data in the neighborhood of the second and third resonance frequencies: (a) POM energy curvature corresponding to the first POV in the second resonance frequency, (b) POM energy curvature corresponding to the second POV in the second resonance frequency, and (c) POM energy curvature corresponding to the first POV in the third resonance frequency

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Fig. 6

Damage and measurement locations of test beam

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