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Research Papers

Numerical Investigation of Lateral and Axial Wave Propagation in Drill-Strings for Stability Monitoring

[+] Author and Article Information
Yu Liu, Yi Ji

Nonlinear Phenomena Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Rice University,
Houston, TX 77005

Andrew J. Dick

Nonlinear Phenomena Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Rice University,
Houston, TX 77005
e-mail: andrew.j.dick@rice.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received August 6, 2014; final manuscript received February 27, 2015; published online April 15, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Marco Amabili.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(4), 041014 (Aug 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1291; doi: 10.1115/1.4029992 History: Received August 06, 2014; Revised February 27, 2015; Online April 15, 2015

In this paper, the propagation of lateral waves and axial acoustic waves in a drill-string are studied by using a new numerical method and a stability monitoring scheme is proposed. The drill-string is modeled as a linear beam structure under gravitational field effects. Lateral and axial motions are assumed to be decoupled, and the corresponding equations of motion are derived. An iterative wavelet-based spectral finite element method (WSFEM) model is developed to obtain a high fidelity response. Numerical simulations of the lateral impact wave propagation at the bottom-hole-assembly (BHA) are first conducted, and a time-frequency analysis technique is applied to the response in order to identify the relationship between the position of the transition point between positive and negative strain and the dispersive properties of the lateral wave. Next, axial acoustic wave propagation through the upper drill-pipe is studied to explore the banded transmission properties of the drill-string introduced by periodic joints. Based on the results, a new monitoring scheme is proposed to monitor the stability of the drill-string by conducting a combination of lateral impact wave analysis at the BHA and the axial acoustic telemetry technique. The new numerical method used in this study provides a unified approach to study the wave propagation in drill-strings, and the proposed stability monitoring scheme is expected to be applicable in drill-string operations.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

A diagram of the BHA for simulation

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Fig. 2

(a) Impact force profile and (b) spectral information of the impact force

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Fig. 3

Impact wave propagation through the BHA

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Fig. 4

Comparison between particle velocity response at the receiver for cases WG, xn = 100 m, and xn = 200 m

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Fig. 5

Comparison between STFT results at the receiver for cases WG, xn = 100 m, and xn = 200 m

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Fig. 6

The value of the metric of dispersion

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Fig. 7

A diagram of the drill-pipe for simulation

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Fig. 8

A comparison of the Fourier transform of the input signal and the output response at the receiver

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Fig. 9

(a) The velocity response at the source location when the frequency of the excitation signal is 160 Hz. (b) The velocity response at the receiver when the frequency of the excitation signal is 160 Hz.

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Fig. 10

Axial wave propagation through the drill-pipe when the frequency of the excitation signal is 160 Hz

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Fig. 11

(a) The velocity response at the source location when the frequency of the excitation signal is 250 Hz. (b) The velocity response at the receiver when the frequency of the excitation signal is 250 Hz.

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Fig. 12

Axial wave propagation through the drill-pipe when the frequency of the excitation signal is 250 Hz

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Fig. 13

The transmission rate with respect to frequency and pipe length

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Fig. 14

A new stability monitoring scheme of the BHA

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