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Research Papers

Detection of Bearing Fault Detection From Heavily Contaminated Signals: A Higher-Order Analytic Energy Operator Method

[+] Author and Article Information
H. Faghidi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Ottawa,
770 King Edward,
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada

M. Liang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Ottawa,
770 King Edward,
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
e-mail: liang@eng.uOttawa.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received June 24, 2014; final manuscript received February 4, 2015; published online April 14, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Patrick S. Keogh.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(4), 041012 (Aug 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1226; doi: 10.1115/1.4029990 History: Received June 24, 2014; Revised February 04, 2015; Online April 14, 2015

This paper reports a higher-order analytic energy operator (HO-AEO) approach to monitoring bearing health conditions from vibrations signals that are polluted by strong noise and multiple interferences. The proposed analytic energy operator (AEO) is formed using the raw signal, its Hilbert transform, and their derivatives. In analogy to the conventional energy operator (EO), it represents an alternative energy transformation. However, unlike the conventional EO, it exploits the information from both the real and imaginary parts of the analytic signal. It can also extract both the amplitude and frequency modulations and is thus well suited for detecting impulsive fault signature. The joint use of multiple higher-order AEOs can further offset noise effect. The built-in amplitude demodulation (AD) capability of the proposed HO-AEO eliminates the enveloping step required by most high-frequency resonance (HFR) methods. The method is simple and easy to implement. Our simulation and experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively extract bearing fault signature in the presence of heavy noise and multiple vibration interferences. It has also been shown mathematically that the HO-AEO processed signal yields higher signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) than the conventional EO does. The simulation and experimental comparisons also indicate that the proposed method has much better noise and interference handling capabilities than the conventional EO.

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Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Bearings , Signals , Vibration
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Simulated signal of a faulty bearing

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Fig. 2

Flowchart of the HO-AEO method

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Fig. 3

(a) Simulated faulty bearing signal with harsh noise and interfering components (SIR = −15 dB, SNR = −15 dB) and (b) spectrum of this simulated signal

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Fig. 4

(a) Envelope spectrum of the signal and (b) spectrum of the EO processed signal

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Fig. 5

Spectrum of the HO-AEO result

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Fig. 6

Experimental setup

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Fig. 7

(a) Part of the measured signal of a bearing with an inner race fault from and (b) the spectrum of the faulty bearing signal

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Fig. 8

(a) Envelope spectrum of the same faulty bearing signal (shown in Fig. 7(a)) and (b) the spectrum of the EO result

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Fig. 9

Spectrum of the HO-AEO processed faulty bearing signal (shown in Fig. 7(a))

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Fig. 10

(a) Part of the measured signal of a bearing with an outer race fault from, and (b) the spectrum of the faulty bearing signal

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Fig. 11

(a) Envelope spectrum of the faulty bearing signal (shown in Fig. 10(a)) and (b) the spectrum of the EO result of the same raw signal

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Fig. 12

Spectrum of the HO-AEO processed faulty bearing signal

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