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Research Papers

A Condensation Method for the Dynamic Analysis of Vertical Vehicle–Track Interaction Considering Vehicle Flexibility

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuanchang Chen

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering,
Hunan University,
2 Lushan Road South,
Yuelu District, Changsha,
Hunan 410082, China
e-mail: y.c.chen1990@gmail.com

Bangji Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering,
Hunan University,
2 Lushan Road South,
Yuelu District, Changsha,
Hunan 410082, China
e-mail: bangjizhang@hnu.edu.cn

Nong Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering,
Hunan University,
2 Lushan Road South,
Yuelu District, Changsha,
Hunan 410082, China
e-mail: nong_zhang@163.com

Minyi Zheng

State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design
and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body,
College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering,
Hunan University,
2 Lushan Road South,
Yuelu District, Changsha,
Hunan 410082, China
e-mail: zheng_minyi@163.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received November 2, 2014; final manuscript received February 25, 2015; published online April 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Corina Sandu.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(4), 041010 (Aug 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1423; doi: 10.1115/1.4029947 History: Received November 02, 2014; Revised February 25, 2015; Online April 09, 2015

This paper is aimed at developing a computationally efficient approach to simulate the vertical dynamic behavior of vehicle–track coupled system. With the finite element method, the car body, bogies, and rail are modeled as Euler beams supported by springs and dashpots, which can investigate the influence of flexibility of the vehicle on structural dynamic response. By a variant of component-mode synthesis (CMS), the degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) within the substructures are condensed and the two substructures are coupled through nonlinear Hertzian theory. Although the system matrix is updated and factorized during the calculation, the total computational efficiency is significantly improved due to the much smaller size of the equations of motion and direct solution algorithm instead of iterative procedure. Compared with an existing model, the accuracy and efficiency of the method are investigated. Application of the model is shown by numerical example.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Vehicle–rail coupled model

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Fig. 2

Comparison of wheel–rail contact force (a) and rail deflection at contact point (b) predicted by the current model for the results calculated by Zhai model [13]

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Fig. 3

Wheel–rail contact force P response of running vehicle stimulated by rail joint (calculated by proposed model)

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Fig. 4

Computation time versus the distance vehicle traveled

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Fig. 5

Maximum wheel–rail contact force (a) and maximum rail displacement (b) at contact point versus the time step

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Fig. 6

Time history of wheel–rail contact force when various numbers of modes the vehicle (a) and rail (b) retained and compared with Zhai model

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Fig. 7

Maximum vertical acceleration of the car body at midspan versus the car body first-order vertical bending frequency

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