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Research Papers

Commanded Motion Optimization to Reduce Residual Vibration

[+] Author and Article Information
Alberto Borboni

Mem. ASME
Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Università degli Studi di Brescia,
Via Branze, 38,
Brescia 25123, Italy
e-mail: alberto.borboni@ing.unibs.it

Matteo Lancini

Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Università degli Studi di Brescia,
Via Branze, 38,
Brescia 25123, Italy
e-mail: matteo.lancini@ing.unibs.it

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received January 23, 2014; final manuscript received January 8, 2015; published online February 18, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Patrick S. Keogh.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(3), 031016 (Jun 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1024; doi: 10.1115/1.4029575 History: Received January 23, 2014; Revised January 08, 2015; Online February 18, 2015

Residual vibrations affect machines at the end of commanded motion and can cause a lengthening of the work cycle. The proposed work addresses to the reduction of this undesired phenomenon with an optimization approach based on the Fourier transformation of the motion profile suppressing a band of exciting frequencies around the natural frequencies of the system. Experimental results confirmed a significant improvement, in terms of residual vibrations, with respect to the state of the art of motion profiles specifically designed for residual vibrations reduction.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Vibration associated with a step command

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Fig. 2

Lumped parameter model of the system

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Fig. 3

Frequency spectrum of the device

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Fig. 6

Experimental testbench, where: (1) is the linear guide, (2) is the acquisition system, made up by a NI 9215 voltage acquisition board (in 3), an NI 9233 IEPE acquisition board (in 4), (5) is a Wilcoxon 732A piezo-accelerometer, (6) is an EGCSY-240D2 accelerometer, (7) is the servocontroller E1000, (8) is the power generator, (9) is the frame, (10) is the linear actuator PS01-23x80/30x90, (11) is the elastic joint SMCJB20-5-080, and (12) is the slider

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Fig. 7

Output acceleration profile before (top diagram) and after (bottom diagram) the optimization of a cycloidal commanded acceleration measured with a piezoelectric accelerometer (black) and with a piezoresistive accelerometer (gray)

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Fig. 8

Output accelerations measured with a piezoresistive sensor (gray) and with a piezoelectric sensor (light gray), when the input acceleration is composed by: a cycloid (stroke = 10 mm and motion time is 0.125 ms), a dwell for 0.125 ms, a returning cycloid (stroke = −10 mm and motion time is 0.125 ms), and a second dwell for 0.125 ms

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Fig. 9

FFT of the output acceleration measured with a piezoresistive sensor (light gray) and with a piezoelectric sensor (dark gray), when the input acceleration is composed by: a cycloid (stroke = 10 mm and motion time is 0.125 ms), a dwell for 0.125 ms a returning cycloid (stroke = −10 mm and motion time is 0.125 ms), and a second dwell for 0.125 ms

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Fig. 10

Power spectrum density diagram of the output acceleration measured with a piezoresistive sensor (light gray) and with a piezoelectric sensor (dark gray), when the input acceleration is composed by: a cycloid (stroke = 10 mm and motion time is 0.125 ms), a dwell for 0.125 ms a returning cycloid (stroke = −10 mm and motion time is 0.125 ms), and a second dwell for 0.125 ms

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Fig. 11

Comparison chart of PRV for tested motion profile in standard and optimized format, computed both in first and second dwell phase

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Fig. 12

PRV improvement versus PRV base value of the motion profile

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Fig. 13

Percentage reduction of vibration settling time after motion profile optimization

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Fig. 5

Normalized acceleration profiles: cycloidal profile (black) and optimized profile (gray)

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Fig. 4

Schematization of the flowchart

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