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Research Papers

Experimental Implementation of Opposed Shape Memory Alloy Wires for Actuator Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Jeremy Kolansky

Vibrations, Adaptive Structures
and Testing Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: kolansky@vt.edu

Pablo Tarazaga

Vibrations, Adaptive Structures
and Testing Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, VA 24061

O. John Ohanian,, III

AVID LLC,
Blacksburg, VA 24060

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received February 27, 2014; final manuscript received October 10, 2014; published online November 12, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Mohammed Daqaq.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(1), 011007 (Feb 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1062; doi: 10.1115/1.4028831 History: Received February 27, 2014; Revised October 10, 2014; Online November 12, 2014

Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are capable linear actuators. This research demonstrates the capabilities of SMA wires for the control of a pivot actuator. The wires impart opposing forces to control the motion of the pivot, and their deformation lengths are used to control the angle of rotation. The performance of the actuator is demonstrated through the tracking of a trajectory. Several effects that are important to the behavior of the actuator are also investigated. These are the block force generation of SMA wires for various temperatures and cooling strategies, and the open-loop response of the system.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Opposed SMA wire actuator

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Fig. 2

Transformation temperatures for an SMA wire with an applied external stress

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Fig. 3

Block force experimental setup

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Fig. 4

Actuator experimental setup

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Fig. 5

Force degradation response of a 100 μm wire when the SMA wire is over heated

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Fig. 6

Block force generation for two different cooling rates. Unchilled (18 °C) and chilled (0 °C).

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Fig. 7

Actuator sine wave voltage signal

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Fig. 8

Actuator displacement without convective cooling for a 0.01 Hz input signal

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Fig. 9

Actuator displacement without convective cooling for a 0.075 Hz input signal

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Fig. 10

Actuator displacement without convective cooling for a 0.1 Hz input signal

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Fig. 11

Actuator displacement for both cooled and uncooled responses for a 0.01 Hz input signal

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Fig. 12

Actuator displacement without convective cooling for a 0.125 Hz input signal

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Fig. 13

Actuator displacement without convective cooling for a 0.3 Hz input signal

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Fig. 14

Actuator displacement with convective cooling for 0.5 Hz input signal

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Fig. 15

PI control scheme

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Fig. 16

Trajectory tracking of a 0.1 Hz sine signal without convective cooling

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Fig. 17

Trajectory tracking of a 2 Hz sine signal without convective cooling

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Fig. 18

Trajectory tracking of a 2 Hz sine signal with convective cooling

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Fig. 19

Trajectory tracking of a 4 Hz sine signal with convective cooling

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