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Research Papers

Pulsation Energy in the Suction Manifold of a Reciprocating Compressor as a Measure for Parameter Sensitivity

[+] Author and Article Information
Nasir Bilal

Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: nasirbilal@gmail.com

Douglas E. Adams

Distinguished Professor and Chair
Civil and Environmental Engineering,
Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN 37235-1831
e-mail: douglas.adams@vanderbilt.edu

Contributed by the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received July 30, 2013; final manuscript received October 10, 2014; published online January 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Theodore Farabee.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(2), 021014 (Apr 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: VIB-13-1265; doi: 10.1115/1.4028830 History: Received July 30, 2013; Revised October 10, 2014; Online January 20, 2015

Gas pulsations in a compressor suction manifold radiate noise and reduce the efficiency of the compressor. The objective of this paper is to identify and quantify the effects of modeling assumptions and uncertainties in input parameters on the pulsation model output predictions and to estimate the sensitivity of the model to changes in the input design parameters. A unique method of sensitivity analysis is presented that uses the total pulsation energy in the suction manifold of a compressor as a measure of gas pulsations. This method is used to determine the sensitivity of the gas pulsations in the suction manifold to input design parameters. First, the gas pulsations in the suction manifold are calculated using linear acoustic theory. Second, the effects of varying several different design parameters of the suction manifold on gas pulsations are analyzed, and the three most important parameters are selected. Next, energy due to gas pulsations in the suction manifold due to these design parameter variations is calculated. Suction manifold radius was identified as the most critical parameter, followed by width and depth. The optimized values of manifold radius resulted in an overall reduction of up to 24% in the gas pulsation energy compared to the pulsation energy at the nominal design parameter values in the suction manifold.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) A multicylinder reciprocating compressor; (b) the suction manifold of the compressor with suction valves marked; and (c) simplified geometrical representation of the suction manifold, where r, b, and ha, respectively, represent radius, depth, and width of the suction manifold

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Fig. 2

A schematic of a seven-cylinder compressor (adapted from Ref. [30])

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Fig. 3

Basic schematic of compressor simulation model

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Fig. 4

Flow chart for compressor computer simulation (adapted from Ref. [30])

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Fig. 5

PV-diagram for a compressor [9]

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Fig. 6

Square-edged orifice [9]

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Fig. 7

(a) Complex real suction manifold and (b) a simplified annular cavity with area change (adapted from Ref. [30])

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Fig. 8

A simplified version of the manifold with valve locations and inlet and outlet ports [9]

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Fig. 9

Gas pulsations in the frequency domain at 2000 rpm with (a) 50 kg/h and (b) 70 kg/h (— analysis, — experiment)

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Fig. 10

Nominal pressure data for the suction manifold at 2000 rpm and 90 kg/h

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Fig. 11

Individual cylinder baseline energy (N/m2)2 of the suction manifold at 2000 rpm and 90 kg/h

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Fig. 12

Schematic for the method of total pulsation energy

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Fig. 13

Pulsation energy (vertical/blue lines) and baseline energy (horizontal dashed/red lines) for the complete set of iterations for all six valve locations

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Fig. 14

Total manifold pulsation energy (vertical/blue lines), baseline pulsation energy (horizontal dashed/red lines), and mean energy (horizontal solid/black lines) over the entire range of iterations

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Fig. 15

Total manifold pulsation energy in ascending order (blue/solid line) and baseline pulsation energy (horizontal dashed/red lines)

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Fig. 16

Pressure pulsation at valve location versus frequency for low energy level (blue/solid line) compared with baseline energy (red/dashed line)

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Fig. 17

Pressure pulsation at valve location versus frequency for intermediate energy level (blue/solid line) compared with baseline energy (red/dashed line)

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Fig. 18

Pressure pulsation at valve location versus frequency for high energy level (blue/solid line) compared with baseline energy (red/dashed line)

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Fig. 19

Energy variations with changing manifold radius at 2000 rpm and 90 kg/h. Energy of each design-iteration (vertical/blue) is shown in comparison with baseline energy (horizontal/red).

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Fig. 20

Energy variation with changing manifold depth at 2000 rpm and 90 kg/h. Energy of each design-iteration (vertical/blue) compared with baseline energy (horizontal dashed/red).

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Fig. 21

Energy variation with changing manifold width at 2000 rpm and 90 kg/h. Energy of each iteration (vertical/blue) compared with baseline energy (dashed/red).

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Fig. 22

Energy variations with changing manifold radius at 1500 rpm and 70 kg/h. Energy of each iteration (vertical/blue) is shown in comparison with baseline energy (horizontal/red).

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Fig. 23

Energy variations with changing manifold depth at 1500 rpm and 70 kg/h. Energy of each iteration (vertical/blue) is shown in comparison with baseline energy (horizontal dashed/red).

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Fig. 24

Energy variations with changing manifold width at 1500 rpm and 70 kg/h. Energy of each iteration (vertical/blue) is shown in comparison with baseline energy (horizontal dashed/red).

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