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Research Papers

Comparison Between a Wideband Fractal-Inspired and a Traditional Multicantilever Piezoelectric Energy Converter

[+] Author and Article Information
Davide Castagnetti

Department of Engineering Sciences
and Methods,
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia,
Reggio Emilia (RE) 42122, Italy
e-mail: davide.castagnetti@unimore.it

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received March 28, 2014; final manuscript received August 11, 2014; published online November 12, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Ryan L Harne.

J. Vib. Acoust 137(1), 011001 (Feb 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: VIB-14-1102; doi: 10.1115/1.4028309 History: Received March 28, 2014; Revised August 11, 2014; Online November 12, 2014

Harvesting energy from ambient vibrations in order to power autonomous sensors is a challenging issue. The aim of this work is to compare the power output from an innovative wideband fractal-inspired piezoelectric converter to that from a traditional multicantilever piezoelectric energy converter. In a given frequency range, the converters are tuned on the same eigenfrequencies. The effect of the input acceleration and of the resistive load applied to the converters is investigated experimentally for each of the three eigenfrequencies in the range between 0 and 120 Hz. The fractal-inspired converter exhibits a significantly higher specific output power at the first and third of the eigenfrequencies investigated.

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Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Fractals , Stress
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Figures

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Fig. 5

Prototype of the traditional multicantilever piezoelectric converter

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Fig. 4

Prototype of the fractal-inspired piezoelectric converter

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Fig. 3

Sketch of the prototype of the traditional multicantilever piezoelectric converter

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Fig. 2

Sketch of the prototype of the fractal-inspired piezoelectric converter

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Fig. 1

The fractal-inspired (a) and the traditional (b) geometry for the piezoelectric converter prototypes

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Fig. 6

Tip speed registered experimentally on the fractal-inspired and traditional converter, for an input acceleration equal to 9.81 m/s2

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Fig. 7

Computational prediction of the first (a), second (b), and third (c) eigenmodes of the fractal-inspired converter

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Fig. 8

Peak output voltage for lamina #1 of the fractal-inspired converter (gray columns) and from the corresponding cantilever of the traditional converter (white columns)

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Fig. 9

Specific output power generated from the fractal-inspired converter (gray columns) and from the traditional multicantilever converter (white columns) for an input acceleration equal to 4.90 m/s2 (a)–(c) and 9.81 m/s2 (d)–(f)

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Fig. 10

Specific output power generated by the fractal-inspired converter (solid circles) and by the traditional multicantilever converter (empty triangles), for an input acceleration equal to 4.90 m/s2

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