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Technical Brief

A Study of Three-Dimensional Acoustic Scattering by Arbitrary Distribution Multibodies Using Extended Immersed Boundary Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Yongsong Jiang

Department of Compressor Design,
AVIC Shenyang Engine Design and Research Institute, Shenyang 110015, China
e-mail: yongsong.jiang@gmail.com

Xiaoyu Wang

School of Jet Propulsion,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: bhwxy@sjp.buaa.edu.cn

Xiaodong Jing

School of Jet Propulsion,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: jingxd@buaa.edu.cn

Xiaofeng Sun

School of Jet Propulsion,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: sunxf@buaa.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received June 16, 2013; final manuscript received January 25, 2014; published online April 1, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Theodore Farabee.

J. Vib. Acoust 136(3), 034505 (Apr 01, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: VIB-13-1205; doi: 10.1115/1.4026672 History: Received June 16, 2013; Revised January 25, 2014

A three-dimensional computational model for acoustic scattering with complex geometries is presented, which employs the immersed boundary technique to deal with the effect of both hard and soft wall boundary conditions on the acoustic fields. In this numerical model, the acoustic field is solved on uniform Cartesian grids, together with simple triangle meshes to partition the immersed body surface. A direct force at the Lagrangian points is calculated from an influence matrix system, and then spreads to the neighboring Cartesian grid points to make the acoustic field satisfy the required boundary condition. This method applies a uniform stencil on the whole domain except at the computational boundary, which has the benefit of low dispersion and dissipation errors of the used scheme. The method has been used to simulate two benchmark problems to validate its effectiveness and good agreements with the analytical solutions are achieved. No matter how complex the geometries are, single body or multibodies, complex geometries do not pose any difficulty in this model. Furthermore, a simple implementation of time-domain impedance boundary condition is reported and demonstrates the versatility of the computational model.

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Figures

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Fig. 2

Pressure distribution along the x-axis for the time periodic acoustic wave scattering by a hard sphere at time t = 80

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Fig. 3

Pressure distribution along the y-axis for the time periodic acoustic wave scattering by a hard sphere at time t = 80

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Fig. 4

Pressure and relative error contours on z = 0 section for the time periodic acoustic wave scattering by a hard sphere at time t = 80

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Fig. 5

Sketch of a time periodic acoustic wave scattering by six hard spheres

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Fig. 1

Sketch of computational domain for the time periodic acoustic wave scattering by a hard sphere

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Fig. 6

Pressure contours on z = 0 section for a time periodic acoustic wave scattering by six hard spheres at time t = 125

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Fig. 7

RMS of pressure on z = 0 section for a time periodic acoustic wave scattering by six hard spheres

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Fig. 8

Sketch of a plane wave scattering by a hard sphere

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Fig. 9

Pressure distribution along the x-axis for a plane wave scattering by a soft sphere at time t = 40 (Z = 1.06–965.77i)

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Fig. 10

Sound pressure level for a plane wave scattering by a soft sphere at r = 4 on z = 0 section and t = 40

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