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Technical Brief

Effect of Dimple Offset on the Operational Shock Performance of Small Form Factor Disk Drives

[+] Author and Article Information
Puneet Bhargava

Computer Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California at Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA 94720
e-mail: puneet@berkeley.edu

David B. Bogy

Computer Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of California at Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA 94720

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received March 15, 2009; final manuscript received December 11, 2013; published online March 18, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Jean Zu.

J. Vib. Acoust 136(3), 034501 (Mar 18, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: VIB-09-1052; doi: 10.1115/1.4026671 History: Received March 15, 2009; Revised December 11, 2013

This paper discusses the effect of varying the suspension load dimple location on the shock robustness of small form factor hard disk drives. We use the CML shock simulator, which simulates the structural as well as the air bearing dynamics of the disk drive simultaneously. The location of the dimple is varied and simulations are run for various load positions on the back of the slider, while adjusting the pitch static attitude (PSA) and the roll static attitude (RSA) of the slider such that the flying attitude of the slider remains the same. We simulate shocks of 0.5 ms pulse width for a commercially available slider and suspension designs for a 1 in. drive. We observe that shock resistance is optimal when the dimple is offset toward the leading edge of the slider. This behavior is explained on the basis of a linearized air bearing model. It is also observed that moving the dimple too much toward the leading edge causes the mechanism of shock failure to change resulting in lower shock tolerances.

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References

Bhargava, P., and Bogy, D. B., 2007, “Effect of Shock Pulse Width on the Shock Response of Small Form Factor Disk Drives,” Microsyst. Technol., 13(8–10), pp. 1107–1115. [CrossRef]
Harrison, J. C., and Mundt, M. D., 2000, “Flying Height Response to Mechanical Shock During Operation of a Magnetic Hard Drive,” ASME J. Tribol., 122(1), pp. 260–263. [CrossRef]
Edwards, J. R., 1999, “Finite Element Analysis of the Shock Response and Head Slap Behavior of a Hard Disk Drive,” IEEE Trans. Magn., 35(2), pp. 863–867. [CrossRef]
Kumar, S., Khanna, V., and Sri-Jayantha, M., 1994, “A Study of the Head Disk Interface Shock Failure,” Sixth Joint Magnetism and Magnetic Materials-Intermag Conference, Albuquerque, NM, June 20–23.
Kouhei, T., Yamada, T., Keroba, Y., and Aruga, K., 1995, “A Study of Head–Disk Interface Shock Resistance,” IEEE Trans. Magn., 31(6), pp. 3006–3008. [CrossRef]
Jayson, E. M., Murphy, J., Smith, P. W., and Talke, F. E., 2003, “Shock Modeling of the Head–Media Interface in an Operational Hard Disk Drive,” IEEE Trans. Magn., 39(5), pp. 2429–2432. [CrossRef]
Jiang, Z. W., Takashima, K., and Chonan, S., 1995, “Shock Proof Design of Head Disk Assembly Subjected to Impulsive Excitation,” JSME Int. J., 38(3), pp. 411–419. [CrossRef]
Bhargava, P., and Bogy, D. B., 2007, “Numerical Simulation of Operational-Shock in Small Form Factor Hard Disk Drives,” ASME J. Tribol., 129(1), pp. 153–160. [CrossRef]
Zeng, Q., and Bogy, D. B., 2002, “Numerical Simulation of Shock Response of Disk–Suspension–Slider Air Bearing Systems in Hard Disk Drives,” Microsyst. Technol., 8(4–5), pp. 289–296. [CrossRef]
Bhargava, P., and Bogy, D. B., 2006, The CML Dynamic Load/Unload/Shock Simulator, Ver. 5.1, Computer Mechanics Lab, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, Technical Report No. 2006 009.

Figures

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Fig. 2

Suspension schematic

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Fig. 3

Slider free-body diagram

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Fig. 4

Slider attitude for BC 400G shock

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Fig. 5

Dimple separation and contact force for BC 400G shock

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Fig. 6

Slider attitude for U1 400G shock

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Fig. 7

Dimple separation and contact force for U1 400G shock

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Fig. 9

czminG variation along xl and yl

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Fig. 10

Slider attitude for U2 400G shock

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Fig. 11

Dimple separation and contact force for U2 400G shock

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Fig. 12

Safe shock levels for various dimple locations

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