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Research Papers

Friction-Induced, Self-Excited Vibration of a Pantograph-Catenary System

[+] Author and Article Information
G. X. Chen

e-mail: chen_guangx@163.com

W. H. Zhang, Z. R. Zhou

State Key Laboratory of Traction Power,
Tribology Research Institute,
Southwest Jiaotong University,
Chengdu 610031, China

H. Ouyang

School of Engineering,
University of Liverpool,
Brownlow Street,
Liverpool L69 3GH, UK
e-mail: H.Ouyang@liverpool.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Vibration and Acoustics. Manuscript received May 8, 2012; final manuscript received March 8, 2013; published online June 18, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Brian P. Mann.

J. Vib. Acoust 135(5), 051021 (Jun 18, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: VIB-12-1142; doi: 10.1115/1.4023999 History: Received May 08, 2012; Revised March 08, 2013

A dynamic model of a pantograph-catenary system is established. In the model, motion of the pantograph is coupled with that of the catenary by friction. Stability of the pantograph-catenary system is studied using the finite element complex eigenvalue method. Numerical results show that there is a strong propensity of self-excited vibration of the pantograph-catenary system when the friction coefficient is greater than 0.1. The dynamic transient analysis results show that the self-excited vibration of the pantograph-catenary system can affect the contact condition between the pantograph and catenary. If the amplitude of the self-excited vibration is strong enough, the contact may even get lost. Parameter sensitivity analysis shows that the coefficient of friction, static lift force, pan-head suspension spring stiffness, tension of contact wire, and the spatial location of pantograph have important influences on the friction-induced, self-excited vibration of the pantograph-catenary system. Bringing the friction coefficient below a certain level and choosing a suitable static lift force can suppress or eliminate the contact loss between the pantograph and catenary.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Model of the catenary

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Fig. 2

Model of the pantograph: (a) solid model of the pantograph; (b) finite element model of the pantograph

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Fig. 3

Model of the pantograph-catenary coupled system: (a) an overview of the pantograph-catenary system model (one span); (b) detail of the contact between pantograph and catenary

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Fig. 4

Mode shape of unstable vibration: friction coefficient μ = 0.25; static lift force Fo = 70 N; catenary tension T = 15 kN; pan-head suspension spring stiffness K = 8000 N/m; effective damping ratio ζ = –0.00324; unstable vibration frequency fR = 19.29 Hz

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Fig. 5

Evolution of unstable complex eigenvalues for different friction coefficient: Fo = 70 N; T = 15 kN; K = 8000 N/m

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Fig. 6

Variation of the effective damping ratio with friction coefficient: Fo = 70 N; T = 15 kN; K = 8000 N/m; fR = 19.29 Hz

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Fig. 7

Evolution of unstable complex eigenvalues for different static lift forces: μ = 0.25; T = 15 kN; K = 8000 N/m; fR = 19.29 Hz

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Fig. 8

Variation of the effective damping ratio with static lift force: μ = 0.25; T = 15 kN; K = 8000 N/m; fR = 19.29 Hz

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Fig. 9

Evolution of unstable complex eigenvalues for different stiffness of pan-head suspension spring: μ = 0.25; Fo = 70 N; T = 15 kN

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Fig. 10

Mode shape of unstable vibration: μ = 0.25; Fo = 70 N; T = 15 kN; K = 5000 N/m; ζ = –0.00164; fR = 8.61 Hz

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Fig. 11

Evolution of unstable complex eigenvalues for different tension of contact wire: μ = 0.25; Fo = 70 N; K = 8000 N/m

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Fig. 12

Mode shapes of unstable vibration: μ = 0.25; Fo = 70 N; K = 8000 N/m; T = 20 kN; fR = 19.29 Hz; ζ = –0.0067

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Fig. 13

Spatial locations of the pantograph

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Fig. 14

Variation of the effective damping ratio with the spatial location of the pantograph: μ = 0.25; Fo = 70 N; T = 15 kN; K = 8000 N/m; fR = 19.29 Hz

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Fig. 15

Variation of the contact forces: μ = 0.25; Fo = 70 N; K = 8000 N/m; T = 15 kN; velocity of the pantograph V = 180 km/h

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Fig. 16

PSD of the contact force shown in Fig. 15

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