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Research Papers

Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition-Based Teager Energy Spectrum for Bearing Fault Diagnosis

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhipeng Feng

School of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Science and Technology Beijing,
Beijing 100083, China
e-mail: zhipeng.feng@yahoo.com.cn

Ming J. Zuo

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB T6G 2G8, Canada
e-mail: ming.zuo@ualberta.ca

Rujiang Hao

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Shijiazhuang Railway Institute,
Shijiazhuang 050043, China
e-mail: haorj@sjzri.edu.cn

Fulei Chu

Department of Precision Instruments
and Mechanology,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: chufl@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Jay Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072
e-mail: jay.lee@uc.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Vibration and Acoustics. Manuscript received October 25, 2011; final manuscript received January 16, 2013; published online April 24, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Alan Palazzolo.

J. Vib. Acoust 135(3), 031013 (Apr 24, 2013) (21 pages) Paper No: VIB-11-1258; doi: 10.1115/1.4023814 History: Received October 25, 2011; Revised January 16, 2013

Periodic impulses in vibration signals and its repeating frequency are the key indicators for diagnosing the local damage of rolling element bearings. A new method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and the Teager energy operator is proposed to extract the characteristic frequency of bearing fault. The signal is firstly decomposed into monocomponents by means of EEMD to satisfy the monocomponent requirement by the Teager energy operator. Then, the intrinsic mode function (IMF) of interest is selected according to its correlation with the original signal and its kurtosis. Next, the Teager energy operator is applied to the selected IMF to detect fault-induced impulses. Finally, Fourier transform is applied to the obtained Teager energy series to identify the repeating frequency of fault-induced periodic impulses and thereby to diagnose bearing faults. The principle of the method is illustrated by the analyses of simulated bearing vibration signals. Its effectiveness in extracting the characteristic frequency of bearing faults, and especially its performance in identifying the symptoms of weak and compound faults, are validated by the experimental signal analyses of both seeded fault experiments and a run-to-failure test. Comparison studies show its better performance than, or complements to, the traditional spectral analysis and the squared envelope spectral analysis methods.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Analysis result of a simulated signal. (a) Waveform. (b) Power spectrum. (c) Instantaneous Teager energy. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 2

Analysis result of a simulated signal. (a) Waveform. (b) Power spectrum. (c1) Signal and IMF1-5. (c2) IMF6-10 and residue. (d) Correlation coefficient. (e) Kurtosis of IMFs. (f) Instantaneous Teager energy of IMF1. (g) Teager energy spectrum of IMF1. (h) Squared envelope. (i) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 4

Seeded damage on bearing elements

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Fig. 5

Normal bearing signal. (a) Waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c) IMF 2. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 6

Outer race–damaged bearing signal. (a1) Waveform. (a2) Zoomed-in waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c1) IMF 2. (c2) Zoomed-in IMF2. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e1) Squared envelope. (e2) Zoomed-in squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 7

Inner race–damaged bearing signal. (a) Waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c) IMF 2. (d1) Teager energy spectrum. (d2) Zoomed-in Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 8

Ball-damaged bearing signal. (a) Waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c) IMF 2. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 9

Compound-damaged bearing signal. (a) Waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c) IMF 3. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 10

Experimental setup of bearing run-to-failure test [25]

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Fig. 11

Outer race damage of bearing 1 [25]

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Fig. 12

Normal bearing signal measured on day 2. (a) Waveform. (b) Power spectrum. (c) IMF 1. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 13

Severely damaged bearing signal measured on day 8. (a) Waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c) IMF 1. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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Fig. 14

Weakly damaged bearing signal measured on day 4. (a) Waveform. (b1) Power spectrum. (b2) Zoomed-in power spectrum. (c) IMF 1. (d) Teager energy spectrum. (e) Squared envelope. (f) Squared envelope spectrum.

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