0
Research Papers

Modeling and Validation of Rotational Vibration Responses for Accessory Drive System—Part II: Simulations and Analyses

[+] Author and Article Information
Wen-Bin Shangguan

School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering,
South China University of Technology,
Guangzhou 510641, People's Republic of China
e-mail: shangguanwb99@tsinghua.org.cn

Xiang-Kun Zeng

School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering,
South China University of Technology,
Guangzhou 510641, People's Republic of China;
GuangDong Polytechnic Normal University,
Guangzhou 510641, People's Republic of China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received December 23, 2011; final manuscript received September 24, 2012; published online March 28, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Jean Zu.

J. Vib. Acoust 135(3), 031003 (Mar 28, 2013) (13 pages) Paper No: VIB-12-1007; doi: 10.1115/1.4023140 History: Received December 23, 2011; Revised September 24, 2012

This is the second part of the paper for modeling and validation of the rotational vibration responses for an accessory drive system. The unified formulas for modeling the rotational vibration of an accessory drive system are presented. In the modeling of an accessory drive system, the damping and stiffness of a belt are regarded as the function of the excitation frequency of an engine and the amplitude of belt stretching. Additionally, the creeping effect of a belt on the pulley wrap arc is included in the model. A general purpose software for calculating the rotational vibration of an accessory drive system is developed, based on the presented unified formulas. One accessory drive system with seven pulleys, a tensioner, and a serpentine belt is used as a studying example to demonstrate the unified formulas and the procedure for obtaining the rotational vibration. In the simulation of the accessory drive system, the stiffness and damping of the belt, the friction coefficient between the belt and pulley, and the excitation torques with multifrequency components from the crankshaft torsional vibration are obtained from the experiment in the first part of this paper. The static tension and steady-state tension of each belt span, along with the natural frequency of the accessory drive system, rotational vibrations of the driven pulley and tensioner arm, and the dynamic tension of the belt span are calculated and compared well with the experimental data, which validate the presented unified formulas and the developed general purpose software. The modeling method and the procedure described in this paper are instructive for designing an accessory drive system.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Configuration of the geometry for a tensioner and two driven pulleys adjacent to the TEN pulley: (1) driven pulley Pj-1, (2) TEN pulley Pj, (3) driven pulley Pj+1, and (4) TEN arm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Definition of the contact angle ψj-1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Points A and B are at the first quadrant in the coordinate system C-X'Y'

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Points A and B are at the first or fourth quadrant in the coordinate system O'-X'Y'

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Configuration of the geometry for a tensioner

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Configuration of an accessory drive system with seven pulleys, a tensioner, and a belt: (1) CS pulley (driving pulley), (2) AC pulley, (3) IDL1, (4) ALT pulley, (5) PS pulley, (6) IDL2, (7) WP pulley, and (8) TEN pulley

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Definition of the contact angle ψ7

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Configuration of the geometry for the tensioner in Fig. 6

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Flow chart for calculating the TEN arm angle θt0 under static status

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Flow chart for calculating the variables θt* under the steady-state condition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Dynamic tensions versus time for belt spans B1 and B8 when the engine runs at 1000 rpm [5]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Dynamic tensions versus engine speed for belt spans B1 and B8

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Rotational vibrations versus time for the AC pulley, ALT pulley, and TEN arm when the driving pulley runs at 1000 rpm [5]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Rotational vibrations versus engine speed for the AC pulley, ALT pulley, and TEN arm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Slip ratio between the belt and ALT pulley versus time when the engine runs at 1000 rpm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Calculated slip factors versus time for the CS, AC, and ALT pulleys when the driving pulley runs at 1000 rpm [5]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Calculated amplitudes of the slip factor versus engine speed for the CS, AC, and ALT pulleys

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Rotational vibrations versus time for the AC pulley, ALT pulley, and TEN arm with or without considering the belt creeping when the driving pulley runs at 1000 rpm [5]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Dynamic tensions of the belt spans B1 and B8 versus time with or without considering belt creeping

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Slip factor of the CS (ALT) pulley versus time with or without considering belt creeping

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In