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Research Papers

Modeling and Validation of Rotational Vibration Responses for Accessory Drive Systems—Part I: Experiments and Belt Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
Wen-Bin Shangguan

School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering,
South China University of Technology,
Guangzhou 510641, P. R. China
e-mail: shangguanwb99@tsinghua.org.cn

Xiang-Kun Zeng

School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering,
South China University of Technology,
Guangzhou 510641, P. R. China;
GuangDong Polytechnic Normal University,
Guangzhou 510641, P. R. China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received December 23, 2011; final manuscript received September 24, 2012; published online March 28, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Jean Zu.

J. Vib. Acoust 135(3), 031002 (Mar 28, 2013) (14 pages) Paper No: VIB-12-1006; doi: 10.1115/1.4023139 History: Received December 23, 2011; Revised September 24, 2012

Experimental and modeling techniques for belt longitudinal static stiffness, longitudinal dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient, bending stiffness, and friction coefficient between a pulley and a belt are presented. Two methods for measuring longitudinal dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of a belt are used, and the experimental results are compared. Experimental results show that the longitudinal dynamic stiffness of a belt is dependent on belt length, pretension, excitation amplitude and excitation frequency, and the damping coefficient of a belt is dependent on excitation frequency. Two models are presented to model the dependence of longitudinal dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of a belt on belt length, pretension, excitation amplitude and excitation frequency. The proposed model is validated by comparing the estimated dynamic stiffness and damping with the experiment data. Also, the measurements of belt bending stiffness are carried out and the influences of the belt length on the belt bending stiffness are investigated. One test rig for measuring friction coefficient between a pulley and a belt are designed and fabricated, and the friction coefficient between the groove side belt with the groove side pulley, and the flat side belt with a flat pulley is measured with the test rig. The influences of wrap angle between pulley and belt, pretension of belt and rotational speed of the pulley on the friction coefficient are measured and analyzed. Taking an engine front end accessory drive system (FEAD) as the research example for the accessory drive system, experimental methods and the static and dynamic characteristics for the FEAD with seven pulleys, a tensioner, and a serpentine belt are presented.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Topics: Pulleys , Belts , Stiffness
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Configuration of the cross section for a serpentine belt

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Fig. 2

Experimental setup for measurement of belt longitudinal and transverse mechanical properties: 1—mobile jaw, 2—shock hammer, 3—laser displacement sensor, 4—fixture, 5—fixed jaw, 6—serpentine belt

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Fig. 3

Measurement of belt longitudinal dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient by shock hammer method

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Fig. 4

Amplitude-frequency response curve for the mass of the belt-mass system

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Fig. 5

Measurement of the friction coefficient between pulley and belt: 1—tension regulator, 2—force sensor, 3—alternator pulley, 4—angle encoder, 5—pillar

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Fig. 6

Force versus displacement for a serpentine belt when belt length is equal to 370 mm

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Fig. 7

The influences of belt length on the longitudinal dynamic performances of a belt if pretension and excitation amplitude are fixed (F = 450 N, Am = 0.3 mm)

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Fig. 8

The influences of excitation amplitudes on the longitudinal dynamic performances of belt if pretension and belt length are fixed (F = 300 N, L = 370 mm)

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Fig. 9

The influences of pretension on the longitudinal dynamic performances for belt if the excitation amplitude and belt length are fixed (Am = 0.3 mm, L = 370 mm)

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Fig. 10

Measured longitudinal dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of the belt with MTS 831 with different excitation amplitude if pretension and belt length are fixed (F = 450 N, L = 290 mm)

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Fig. 11

Calculated longitudinal dynamic stiffness of belt with MTS 831 compared with the experimental data (F1 = 300 N,F2 = 450 N;  Am1 = 0.1mm, Am2 = 0.2 mm, Am3 = 0.3 mm; L1= 270  mm,L2 = 370, L3 = 450 mm)

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Fig. 12

Calculated damping coefficient of a belt compared with the experimental data when pretension is equal to 300 N and belt length is equal to 370 mm

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Fig. 13

The measured frequency-response curves of the transverse displacement for belt midpoint versus the belt's longitudinal tensions when the belt length is equal to 438 mm

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Fig. 14

Measured belt tensions, rotational speed of pulley versus time, and friction coefficient between the groove side belt with the groove side pulley when pretension is equal to 400 N and wrap angle is equal to 66.13 deg

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Fig. 15

The influences of belt pretensions on the friction coefficient when rotational speed of pulley is equal to 100 rev/min and wrap angle is equal to 66.13 deg

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Fig. 16

The influences of wrap angles on the friction coefficient when rotational speed of pulley is equal to 100 rev/min and belt pretension is equal to 200 N

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Fig. 17

The influences of rotational speed of pulley on the friction coefficient when belt pretension is equal to 200 N and wrap angle is equal to 53.15 deg

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Fig. 18

Test rig for measuring dynamic performances of an accessory drive system [9]

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Fig. 19

Schematic of an accessory drive system [9]: 1—CS pulley, 2—AC pulley, 3—IDL1, 4—ALT pulley, 5—PS pulley, 6—IDL2, 7—WP pulley, 8—TEN pulley

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Fig. 20

Tensioner assembly geometry

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Fig. 21

Rotational vibration for the CS pulley versus CS speed

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Fig. 22

Rotational vibration for the AC pulley and ALT pulley versus CS speed [9]

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Fig. 23

Rotational vibration for the TEN arm [9]

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Fig. 24

Slip ratios between the belt and the CS pulley, ALT pulley versus CS speed

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Fig. 25

Hubload of the TEN pulley versus CS speed

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Fig. 26

Dynamic tension of the belt span B8 when the CS speed is 1000 rev/min

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Fig. 27

Transverse vibration displacement of the belt span B1 midpoint [9]

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