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Research Papers

Identification of Acoustic Characteristics of Honeycomb Sandwich Composite Panels Using Hybrid Analytical/Finite Element Method1

[+] Author and Article Information
Yong-Joe Kim

Mem. ASME

e-mail: joekim@tamu.edu

Je-Heon Han

e-mail: jeep2000@tamu.edu
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3123

Portions of this work are presented in “Identification of Sound Transmission Characteristics of Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Using Hybrid Analytical/One-Dimensional Finite Element Method,” Proceedings of Inter-Noise 2006, December 2006, Honolulu, HI and “Acoustical Characteristics of Honeycomb Sandwich Composite Panels,” 161st Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, May 2011, Seattle, Washington.

Contributed by the Noise Control and Acoustics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF Vibration And ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received June 2, 2011; final manuscript received June 20, 2012; published online February 4, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Lonny Thompson.

J. Vib. Acoust 135(1), 011006 (Feb 04, 2013) (11 pages) Paper No: VIB-11-1125; doi: 10.1115/1.4007241 History: Received June 02, 2011; Revised June 20, 2012

For the purpose of identifying the acoustic characteristics of honeycomb sandwich panels, finite element method (FEM), combined with boundary element method (BEM), has been widely used. However, the latter approach is not always applicable to high frequency analyses since it requires a large number of FEM/BEM meshes. In order to reduce computational resources and modeling times, a hybrid analytical/finite element method (HAFEM) is described that uses a finite element approximation in the thickness direction, while analytical solutions are assumed in the plane directions. Thus, it makes it possible to use a small number of finite elements, even for high frequency analyses. By using the HAFEM, the wave transmission, propagation, and radiation characteristics of the honeycomb sandwich panels are investigated. The proposed HAFEM procedure is validated by comparing the predicted transmission loss (TL) results to the measured ones. Through the use of the HAFEM model of a honeycomb sandwich panel, it is shown that the structural responses of the panel converge asymptotically to flexural waves in the low audible frequency region, core shear waves in the high audible to ultrasonic frequency region, and skin flexural waves in the high ultrasonic frequency region. Coincident frequencies occur at the transition region from the flexural to core shear wave behaviors. From the TL sensitivities of various panel design parameters, the most dominant design parameters contributing to the TL results are determined as a function of frequency. In order to improve the acoustic performance of the honeycomb sandwich panel while satisfying weight and strength requirements, a new double core honeycomb sandwich panel is designed to have the same mass per unit area as the baseline single core panel but have a larger equivalent flexural stiffness than that of the baseline panel.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of the hybrid FE model of the double-layered panel

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Fig. 2

The TL results of the aluminum panel

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Fig. 3

The TL results of the aluminum-foam-aluminum sandwich panel [26]

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Fig. 4

The TL results of the honeycomb sandwich panel (Configuration 1)

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Fig. 5

The TL results of the honeycomb sandwich panel (Configuration 2)

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Fig. 6

The TL results of the stiffness and mass tuned panels: (a) panel with the skin stiffness decreased by 50%, and (b) panel with the skin mass increased by 50%

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Fig. 7

The TL sensitivities with respect to the material properties of the honeycomb sandwich panel (Configuration 1)

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Fig. 8

Dispersion relation of the honeycomb sandwich panel (Configuration 1): (a) frequency range up to 1 MHz, and (b) zoomed from 500 Hz to 1500 Hz

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Fig. 9

The TL results of the baseline panel (Configuration 1) and the mass-equivalent double leaf panel

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Fig. 10

Sound radiation efficiency of the 4′by 4′ baseline panel (Configuration 1) excited by the point force

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Fig. 11

Acoustic intensities at 187 Hz radiated from the baseline panel (Configuration 1) excited by the point force at (x, y) = (0.2, 0.3) m: (a) active acoustic intensity, and (b) supersonic acoustic intensity

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Fig. 12

The TL results of the baseline panel (Configuration 1) and the mass-equivalent double core panel

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