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Research Papers

A Physics-Based Friction Model and Integration to a Simple Dynamical System

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Eriten

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801

A. A. Polycarpou1

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801

L. A. Bergman

Department of Aerospace Engineering,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801

1

Corresponding author. 1206 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL, 61801, e-mail: Polycarp@illinois.edu.

J. Vib. Acoust 134(5), 051012 (Jun 05, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006182 History: Received October 04, 2011; Revised January 13, 2012; Published June 04, 2012; Online June 05, 2012

Dynamical modeling and simulation of mechanical structures containing jointed interfaces require reduced-order fretting models for efficiency. The reduced-order models in the literature compromise both accuracy and the physical basis of the modeling procedure, especially with regard to interface contact and friction modeling. Recently, physics-based fretting models for nominally flat-on-flat contacts, including roughness effects, have been developed and validated on individual (isolated) mechanical lap joints (Eriten , 2011, “Physics-Based Modeling for Fretting Behavior of Nominally Flat Rough Surfaces,” Int. J. Solids Struct., 48 (10), pp. 1436-1450). These models follow a “bottom up” modeling approach; utilizing the micromechanics of sphere-on-flat fretting contact (asperity scale), and statistical summation to model flat-on-flat contacts at the macroscale. Since these models are physical, the effects of surface roughness, contact conditions, and material properties on fretting and dynamical response of the jointed interfaces can be studied. The present work illustrates an example of how the physics-based models can be incorporated into studies of the dynamics of jointed structures. A comparison with friction models existing in the literature is also provided.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Single degree-of-freedom dynamical system with friction

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Figure 2

Multiscale modeling approach of nominally flat rough contacts

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Figure 3

Power spectra of the impulse response of the mass with different friction models (no friction case is given for reference)

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Figure 4

Ramp response of the mass-spring-damper system with different friction models, and soft and hard structural stiffness

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Figure 5

Phase-portraits of the steady-state harmonic response of the mass with the Regularized Coulomb (a) and Dankowicz (b) friction models, and the corresponding friction forces as a function of position, (c) and (d), respectively

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Figure 6

Phase-portraits of the steady-state harmonic response of the mass with the EPB friction model using smooth (a) and rough (b) contact parameters, and the corresponding friction forces as a function of position, (c) and (d), respectively

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