0
Research Papers

Attenuation of Gas Pulsation in a Reciprocating Compressor Piping System by Using a Volume-Choke-Volume Filter

[+] Author and Article Information
Boxiang Liu, Zhongzhen Wang, Xueyuan Peng

School of Energy and Power Engineering,  Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an, 710049, P. R. C.

Jianmei Feng1

School of Energy and Power Engineering,  Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an, 710049, P. R. C.jmfeng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 134(5), 051002 (Jun 05, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006234 History: Received December 28, 2010; Revised December 07, 2011; Published June 04, 2012; Online June 05, 2012

This paper presents an investigation of the use of a volume-choke-volume low-pass filter to achieve gas pulsation attenuation in a reciprocating compressor piping system, with a focus on its frequency response characteristics and influence on the actual attenuation effects. A three-dimensional acoustic model of the gas pulsation was established for a compressor discharge piping system with and without the volume-choke-volume filter, based on which the gas column natural frequencies of the piping system and the pressure wave profiles were predicted by means of the finite element method. The model was validated by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data. The results showed that the characteristic frequency of the filter was sensitive to both diameter and length of the choke but independent of the parameters of the piping beyond the filter. It is worth noting that the characteristic frequency of the filter constituted one order of the gas column natural frequencies of the piping system with the filter. The pressure pulsation levels in the piping system downstream of the filter could be significantly attenuated especially for the pulsation components at frequencies above the filter’s characteristic frequency. The measured peak-to-peak pressure pulsation at the outlet of the filter was approximately 61.7% lower than that of the surge bottle with the same volume.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Test system for measurement of gas column natural frequencies

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Test system for recording the pulsating pressure profile

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Frequency response of the volume-choke-volume filter

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Frequency response of the filter with different parameters

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Physical model of the discharge piping system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Finite element mesh of the gas column in the piping system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Comparison of the frequency response

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Comparison of the gas column natural frequencies

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Pressure pulsation and amplitude-frequency characteristics in the piping systems: (a) Node 1, (b) Node 2, (c) Node 3, and (d) Node 4

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Comparison of the pressure fluctuation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Comparison of the gas column natural frequencies in the discharge piping systems

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Comparison of pressure pulsation in the piping systems

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Comparison of pressure fluctuation at four nodes

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In