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Research Papers

Sound Radiation From Shear Deformable Stiffened Laminated Plates With Multiple Compliant Layers

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiongtao Cao1

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,  Shanghai Jiaotong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai, 200240 Chinacaolin1324@126.com

Hongxing Hua

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration,  Shanghai Jiaotong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai, 200240 China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 134(5), 051001 (Jun 05, 2012) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006233 History: Received December 04, 2010; Revised December 28, 2011; Published June 04, 2012; Online June 05, 2012

Sound radiation from shear deformable stiffened laminated plates with multiple compliant layers is theoretically studied. Equations of motion for the composite laminated plates are on the basis of the first-order shear deformation plate theory, and the transfer matrix method is used to describe sound transmission through compliant layers. The first and second sets of stiffeners interact with the plate through normal line forces. By using the Fourier transform and stationary phase method, the far-field sound pressure is obtained in terms of analytical expressions. Comparisons are made between the first-order shear deformation plate theory and the classical thin plate theory. Three principal conclusions are drawn in the study. (1) The transverse point force acting on the stiffeners yields lower far-field sound pressure in the middle and high frequency range. Specifically, the transverse point force exerting on the large stiffeners produces the lowest far-field sound pressure among three different reactive points at the plate, small stiffener and large stiffener. (2) The far-field sound pressure spectra are confined by an acoustic circle and remain unchanged. Lots of flexural waves in the structure cannot radiate sound into the far field. (3) The sound attenuation of stiffened plates with compliant layers is mainly caused by the sound isolation of compliant layers rather than vibrational reduction. Compliant layers can effectively reduce the radiated sound pressure in the medium and high frequency range.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

An infinite laminated plate with multiple compliant layers and two sets of parallel stiffeners

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Figure 2

ILp of an isotropic plate with three compliant layers

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Figure 3

SPL of the isotropic plate with two sets of stiffeners

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Figure 4

SPL of the isotropic plate with three compliant layers and two sets of stiffeners

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Figure 5

Sound pressure directivity patterns of the isotropic plate with two sets of stiffeners by using the two plate theories, ϕ = π/6, 2 kHz

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Figure 6

Sound pressure directivity patterns of the isotropic plate with two sets of stiffeners by using the two plate theories, ϕ = π/6, 3.5 kHz

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Figure 7

SPL of the antisymmetric laminated plate with compliant layers and two sets of stiffeners, pe  = 1

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Figure 8

ILp of the antisymmetric laminated plate with compliant layers and two sets of stiffeners, pe  = 1

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Figure 9

Transverse displacement spectra of the top compliant layer for the antisymmetric laminated plate with compliant layers and two sets of stiffeners, pe  = 1, 5 kHz

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Figure 10

(a) Transverse displacement spectra of the plate for the antisymmetric laminated plate with two sets of stiffeners, pe  = 1, m1  = 1, and m2  = 1, 5 kHz; (b) transverse displacement spectra of the top compliant layer for the antisymmetric laminated plate with compliant layers and two sets of stiffeners, pe  = 1, m1  = 1, and m2  = 1, 5 kHz

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