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Research Papers

Efficiency Improvement of an Automatic Ball Balancer

[+] Author and Article Information
Yukio Ishida1

Department of Electronic-Mechanical Engineering,  Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-01, Japan e-mail: ishida@nuem.nagoya-u.ac.jp Motorcycle R&D Center, Honda Motor Co., Ltd., 3-15-1, Senzui, Asaka City, Saitama, 351-0024, Japan e-mail: mnwucii46fka7stk7d00@docomo.ne.jpSchool of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering,  Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an, 710055, China e-mail: zhangxl@ieecas.cn

Tomonori Matsuura, Xiao Long Zhang

Department of Electronic-Mechanical Engineering,  Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-01, Japan e-mail: ishida@nuem.nagoya-u.ac.jp Motorcycle R&D Center, Honda Motor Co., Ltd., 3-15-1, Senzui, Asaka City, Saitama, 351-0024, Japan e-mail: mnwucii46fka7stk7d00@docomo.ne.jpSchool of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering,  Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an, 710055, China e-mail: zhangxl@ieecas.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 134(2), 021012 (Jan 18, 2012) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005013 History: Received December 06, 2009; Revised June 29, 2011; Published January 18, 2012; Online January 18, 2012

An automatic ball balancer is a unique vibration suppression device for rotor systems. Theoretically, two balls in a cylindrical chamber of the rotor are located at the optimal positions on the opposite side to the unbalance and cancel the unbalance automatically in the super-critical speed range. However, this device is not used widely due to two malfunctions. One is the influence of friction. Due to the inevitable friction between the balls and the inside wall of the channel, the balls stop near the optimal positions and do not balance the rotor perfectly. The other is the self-excited oscillation which occurs near and above the major critical speed. The objectives of the present paper are to clarify the fundamental characteristics of a ball balancer and to introduce some simple methods to eliminate these malfunctions.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Numerical simulation

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Figure 4

Experimental setup. (a) Overall view of the setup; (b) section of the disk.

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Figure 5

Experimental result (12 mm, two balls)

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Figure 6

Summary of 30 experiments (d = 12 mm). (a) Amplitude, (b) probability, (c) angular position and amplitude, (d) ball position.

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Figure 7

Summary of 30 experiments (d = 15 mm)

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Figure 8

Static rolling friction (inclination method)

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Figure 9

Amplitude and ball positions (with friction) e = 0.01, c = 0.01, m = 0.00015, a = 100, cb = 0.1, F = 0.2

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Figure 10

Effect of mass on the amplitude distribution (a) m=0.00008 (b) m=0.00015

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Figure 11

Effect of multiple channels (balls, 15 mm). (a) Two balls in one channel, (b) four balls in two channels (2 + 2), (c) six balls in three channels (2 + 2 + 2).

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Figure 12

Experimental result (3 channels, 6 balls)

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Figure 13

Ball balancer with four balls (no friction and no partition, ω  = 1.3). (a) Amplitude and angular positions of balls, (b) angular positions of four balls.

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Figure 14

Amplitudes and ball positions in cases with no partition and with partitions

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Figure 15

Experimental setup with multichannel and partitions

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Figure 16

Multichannel ball balancer with partitions. (a) One channel, (b) two channels.

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Figure 1

Rotor with a ball balancer

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Figure 2

Amplitudes and ball positions

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