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Research Papers

Fluidic Composite Tunable Vibration Isolators

[+] Author and Article Information
Lloyd H. Scarborough

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802lhs123@psu.edu

Christopher D. Rahn1

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802cdrahn@psu.edu

Edward C. Smith

Department of Aerospace Engineering,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

1

Corresponding Author. Present address: 150A Hammond Building, University Park, PA 16802.

J. Vib. Acoust 134(1), 011010 (Dec 28, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004670 History: Received November 02, 2010; Revised April 15, 2011; Accepted May 02, 2011; Published December 28, 2011; Online December 28, 2011

Coupling a fluidic flexible matrix composite (F2MC) to an air-pressurized fluid port produces a fundamentally new class of tunable vibration isolators. This Fluidlastic device provides significant vibration reduction at an isolation frequency that can be tuned over a broad frequency range. The material properties and geometry of the F2MC element, as well as the port inertance, determine the isolation frequency. A unique feature of this device is that the port inertance depends on pressure so the isolation frequency can be adjusted by changing the air pressure. For constant port inertance, the isolation frequency is largely independent of the isolated mass so the device is robust to changes in load. A nonlinear model is developed to predict isolator length and port inertance. The model is linearized and the frequency response calculated. Experiments agree with theory, demonstrating a tunable isolation range from 9 Hz to 36 Hz and transmitted force reductions of up to 60 dB at the isolation frequency.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of an F2 MC tube, illustrating the two families of fibers wound at ±α angles with respect to the longitudinal axis

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Figure 2

Schematic (left) and mechanical equivalent (right) of the fluidic composite isolator

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Figure 3

Theoretical and experimental change in tube length versus static load at four pressures: 210 kPa (solid line and O), 280 kPa (dashed line and X), 340 kPa (dotted line and □), and 410 kPa (dash-dotted line and Δ)

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Figure 4

Theoretical and experimental port fluid level versus pressure (F = 116 N)

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Figure 5

Experimental setup

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Figure 6

Theoretical (solid lines) and experimental (dashed lines) frequency responses for a constant system fluid volume of 30 cm3 and static load of 116 N at four equilibrium pressures: (a) 210 kPa, (b) 280 kPa, (c) 340 kPa, and (d) 410 kPa

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Figure 7

Theoretical and experimental isolation frequency versus equilibrium pressure for three fluid volumes and 116 N static load: 30 cm3 (solid line and symbols), 36 cm3 (dashed line), and 42 cm3 (dotted line)

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Figure 8

Theoretical and experimental isolation frequency versus equilibrium port fluid level at four equilibrium pressures and 116 N static load: 210 kPa (solid line and O), 280 kPa (dashed line and X), 340 kPa (dotted line and □), and 410 kPa (dash-dotted line and Δ)

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Figure 9

Experimental demonstration of the isolation frequency’s insensitivity to static load for constant inertance (heq = 13 cm): Feq = 96 N and p1,eq = 250 kPa (solid line), Feq = 116 N and p1,eq = 280 kPa (dashed line), and Feq = 136 N and p1,eq = 300 kPa (dotted line)

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