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Research Papers

Harvesting Wind Energy Using a Galloping Piezoelectric Beam

[+] Author and Article Information
Jayant Sirohi

Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics,  The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0600, Austin, TX 78712-0235jayant.sirohi@mail.utexas.edu

Rohan Mahadik

Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics,  The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0600, Austin, TX 78712-0235

J. Vib. Acoust 134(1), 011009 (Dec 28, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004674 History: Received October 04, 2010; Revised May 09, 2011; Accepted May 24, 2011; Published December 28, 2011; Online December 28, 2011

Galloping of structures such as transmission lines and bridges is a classical aeroelastic instability that has been considered as harmful and destructive. However, there exists potential to harness useful energy from this phenomenon. This paper focuses on harvesting wind energy that is being transferred to a galloping beam. The beam has a rigid tip body with a D-shaped cross section. Piezoelectric sheets are bonded on the top and bottom surface of the beam. During galloping, vibrational motion is input to the system due to aerodynamic forces on the D-section, which is converted into electrical energy by the piezoelectric (PZT) sheets. The relative importance of various parameters of the system such as wind speed, material properties of the beam, electrical load and beam’s natural frequency are discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dynamic response and power output are performed on a representative device. A maximum output power of 1.14 mW was measured at a wind velocity of 10.5 mph on a prototype device of length 235 mm and width 25 mm. A potential application for this device is to power wireless sensor networks on outdoor structures such as bridges and buildings.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Forces on a D-section in an incident wind

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Figure 2

Cl and Cd plots for a D-section, from Ratkowski [18]. The angle of attack is defined with respect to the flat face.

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Figure 3

Schematic of the device showing galloping mechanism and change in instantaneous angle of attack

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Figure 4

Schematic of the beam geometry and spatial discretization

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Figure 5

Block diagram of solution procedure in matlab Simulink

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Figure 6

Experimental setup showing aluminum beam with piezoelectric (PZT) sheets and D-section tip body

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Figure 7

Measured voltage generated by the piezoelectric sheets, 0.7 MΩ load resistance at wind velocity of 9.5 mph

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Figure 8

Measured voltage generated by the piezoelectric sheets at steady state, 0.7 MΩ load resistance at wind velocity of 9.5 mph

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Figure 9

Measured impulse response of the beam, with electrodes open-circuited

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Figure 10

Comparison of measured and predicted voltage at steady state, 0.7 MΩ load resistance at wind speed of 8 mph

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Figure 11

Transient response of the beam as predicted by analysis, at incident wind speed of 8.6 mph, and 0.7 MΩ load resistance

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Figure 12

Comparison of measured and predicted steady state voltage, as a function of load resistance, at wind speed of 8.5 mph

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Figure 13

Comparison of measured and predicted steady state voltage as a function of incident wind velocity, for 0.7 MΩ load resistance

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Figure 14

Measured power as a function of load resistance, at 8.5 mph wind speed

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Figure 15

Measured and predicted output power versus wind velocity, 0.7 MΩ load resistance

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