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Research Papers

Damping Reduction in Structures Using Piezoelectric Circuitry With Negative Resistance

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Zhao, X. Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, Unit 3139, Storrs, CT 06269

J. Tang1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, Unit 3139, Storrs, CT 06269jtang@engr.uconn.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust. 133(4), 041009 (Apr 08, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003404 History: Received June 07, 2010; Revised November 23, 2010; Published April 08, 2011; Online April 08, 2011

As damping reduction can potentially lead to performance enhancement in certain applications, a scheme based on the concept of piezoelectric circuitry that yields reduced damping effect in a structural system is developed. The piezoelectric circuitry consists of an inductor and a negative resistance circuit serially connected to the piezoelectric transducer that is bonded/embedded to the structure. By using the negative resistance element to reduce the overall resistance of the circuitry to be negative, the resonant vibratory response of the structural system becomes higher while the system remains stable. The stability boundary of the negative resistance is derived for both the ideal piezoelectric transducer model and the transducer model with energy loss. The results are validated via experimental investigations.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) System integrated with piezoelectric inductive circuitry and (b) synthesized negative resistance circuit

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Figure 2

Frequency responses with and without the negative resistance circuitry. ○: original mechanical structure, ×: integrated system without negative resistance, — ⋅ — ⋅: integrated system with r=−0.0241, and ———: integrated system with r=−0.0268.

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Figure 3

Root-locus plot of the integrated system with respect to varying negative resistance ratio r. The stability boundary r=rb corresponds to s1=1.042i and s3=0.955i.

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Figure 4

Piezoelectric transducer models

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Figure 5

Impedance curves of the stand-alone piezoelectric transducer: (a) real-part and (b) imaginary part. ⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅: parallel model, — ⋅ — ⋅: series model, and ———: experimental result.

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Figure 6

Frequency responses with the negative resistance circuitry. ———: ideal transducer model and – – – – ⋅: revised transducer model.

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Figure 7

Zoomed-in root-locus plot of the integrated system with respect to varying negative resistance ratio r. ———: revised transducer model and – – – – ⋅: ideal transducer model.

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Figure 8

Experimental result of impedance (real-part) of the piezoelectric circuitry integrated to the structure

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Figure 9

Frequency response curves when ς=0.0023. – – – – ⋅: structure without circuitry and ———: integrated system with negative resistance −179 Ω.

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Figure 10

Frequency response curves when ςquarter=0.0046. – – – – ⋅: structure without circuitry and ———: integrated system with negative resistance −204 Ω.

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Figure 11

Frequency response curves when ςhalf=0.0062. – – – – ⋅: structure without circuitry and ———: integrated system with negative resistance −234 Ω.

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Figure 12

Frequency response curves when ςfull=0.0134. – – – – ⋅: structure without circuitry and ———: integrated system with negative resistance −314 Ω.

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