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Research Papers

A New Magnetorheological Mount for Vibration Control

[+] Author and Article Information
David York, Xiaojie Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Composite and Intelligent Materials Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557

Faramarz Gordaninejad1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Composite and Intelligent Materials Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557faramarz@unr.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 133(3), 031003 (Mar 24, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002840 History: Received May 22, 2009; Revised April 28, 2010; Published March 24, 2011; Online March 24, 2011

In this study, the performance of a new controllable mount design utilizing a magnetorheological material encapsulated in an elastomer matrix is investigated. A magnetorheological fluid-elastomer (MRF-E) mount is designed and fabricated, and its dynamic performance is studied under harmonic oscillatory vibrations for a wide range of frequencies and various applied magnetic fields. Also, a theoretical analysis is conducted by proposing a three-element phenomenological model for replicating the dynamic behavior of the MRF-E mount under oscillation loadings, and the results are compared with the experimental data. In order to further evaluate the effectiveness of the MRF-E mount for vibration control, a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system incorporated with this device is developed. Theoretically, the equation of motion utilizing the proposed phenomenological model is derived to provide performance predictions on the effectiveness of the semiactive device at suppressing unwanted vibrations. Experimentally, a SDOF system constrained to rectilinear motion and composed of a mass, four linear springs, and the MRF-E mount is designed and manufactured. This work demonstrates the performance of the proposed MRF-E mount and its capability in attenuating undesirable system vibrations for a range of small-displacement amplitudes and frequencies.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 14

Comparison of model predicted results to experimental data: (a) F versus t and (b) F versus X, X0=0.2 mm, f=4.0 Hz, and I=3.0 A

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Figure 15

Comparison of model predicted results to experimental data: (a) F versus t and (b) F versus X, X0=0.3 mm, f=10.0 Hz, and I=0.0 A

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Figure 10

Equivalent viscous damping coefficient at a constant 4.0 Hz for all the tested amplitudes

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Figure 11

Equivalent viscous damping coefficient at a constant 8.0 Hz for all the tested amplitudes

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Figure 12

Schematic design of the proposed phenomenological model

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Figure 13

Comparison of model predicted results to experimental data: (a) F versus t and (b) F versus X, X0=0.1 mm, f=0.50 Hz, and I=2.0 A

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Figure 1

Photograph of MRF-E prototypes: the sample on the left is a poly BD blend and the sample on the right is a RTV silicon

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Figure 2

Schematic of MRF-E vibration isolator design

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Figure 3

(a) Results of electromagnetic finite element analysis inside the MR fluid embedded within the solid MRF-E specimen and (b) results of electromagnetic finite element analysis inside the MR fluid embedded within the hollow MRF-E specimen

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Figure 4

Experimental setup to measure the dynamic properties of the MRF-E prototypes

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Figure 5

(a) Typical force response results to an amplitude of 0.2 mm and frequency of 0.1 Hz with different input currents and (b) hysteresis loop for the same inputs shown in (a)

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Figure 6

(a) Typical force response results to an amplitude of 0.1 mm and frequency of 1.0 Hz with different input currents and (b) hysteresis loop for the same inputs shown in (a)

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Figure 7

Maximum force versus displacement for all tested displacement amplitudes, frequencies, and input currents

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Figure 8

Energy dissipated-per-cycle for an amplitude of 0.3 mm over all frequencies tested

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Figure 9

Energy dissipated-per-cycle for every experimentally tested frequency for all tested amplitudes

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Figure 18

Experimental results for the single degree-of-freedom system at a constant displacement of 0.40 mm during a frequency sweep of 0–60 Hz

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Figure 19

Experimental results for the single degree-of-freedom system at a constant displacement of 0.60 mm during a frequency sweep of 0–60 Hz

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Figure 20

Theoretical model predicted behavior for the single degree-of-freedom system at a constant displacement of 0.40 mm during a frequency sweep of 0–40 Hz

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Figure 21

Theoretical model predicted behavior for the single degree-of-freedom system at a constant displacement of 0.60 mm during a frequency sweep of 0–40 Hz

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Figure 22

Theoretical model predicted behavior for the single degree-of-freedom system at a constant displacement of 0.40 mm and natural frequency of 3.25 Hz

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Figure 23

Theoretical model predicted behavior for the single degree-of-freedom system at a constant displacement of 0.40 mm and natural frequency of 43.0 Hz

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Figure 16

Experimental setup of single degree-of-freedom system with the MR Fluid-Elastomer vibration isolator

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Figure 17

Model of single degree-of-freedom system

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