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Research Papers

Modeling and Analysis of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting From Aeroelastic Vibrations Using the Doublet-Lattice Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Carlos De Marqui1

Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Engineering School of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazildemarqui@sc.usp.br

Wander G. R. Vieira

Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Engineering School of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazilwandergrv@gmail.com

Alper Erturk

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0002erturk@vt.edu

Daniel J. Inman

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0002dinman@vt.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 133(1), 011003 (Dec 08, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002785 History: Received January 22, 2010; Revised July 02, 2010; Published December 08, 2010; Online December 08, 2010

Multifunctional structures are pointed out as an important technology for the design of aircraft with volume, mass, and energy source limitations such as unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). In addition to its primary function of bearing aerodynamic loads, the wing/spar structure of an UAV or a MAV with embedded piezoceramics can provide an extra electrical energy source based on the concept of vibration energy harvesting to power small and wireless electronic components. Aeroelastic vibrations of a lifting surface can be converted into electricity using piezoelectric transduction. In this paper, frequency-domain piezoaeroelastic modeling and analysis of a cantilevered platelike wing with embedded piezoceramics is presented for energy harvesting. The electromechanical finite-element plate model is based on the thin-plate (Kirchhoff) assumptions while the unsteady aerodynamic model uses the doublet-lattice method. The electromechanical and aerodynamic models are combined to obtain the piezoaeroelastic equations, which are solved using a p-k scheme that accounts for the electromechanical coupling. The evolution of the aerodynamic damping and the frequency of each mode are obtained with changing airflow speed for a given electrical circuit. Expressions for piezoaeroelastically coupled frequency response functions (voltage, current, and electrical power as well the vibratory motion) are also defined by combining flow excitation with harmonic base excitation. Hence, piezoaeroelastic evolution can be investigated in frequency domain for different airflow speeds and electrical boundary conditions.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Thin cantilevered wing with embedded piezoceramic layers and its cross-sectional view

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Figure 2

(a) Damping evolution with increasing airflow speed and (b) frequency evolution with increasing airflow speed for the resistive circuit case close to short-circuit conditions (Rl=100 Ω)

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Figure 3

Mode shape at the flutter speed (coupled bending-torsion mode)

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Figure 4

(a) Relative tip motion FRFs and (b) power FRFs for various airflow speeds close to short-circuit conditions (Rl=100 Ω)

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Figure 5

Variation of electrical power output with load resistance at the short-circuit flutter speed and frequency for the resistive circuit case

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Figure 6

(a) Power FRF and (b) relative tip motion FRF with close-up views around the flutter frequency at the short-circuit flutter speed for a load close to short-circuit conditions and for the optimum load resistance that gives the maximum power output

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Figure 7

Variation of electrical power output with load resistance at the short-circuit flutter speed and frequency for the resistive-inductive circuit case

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Figure 8

(a) Power FRFs and (b) relative tip motion FRF at the short-circuit flutter speed for the optimum load resistance

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Figure 9

(a) Damping evolution with increasing airflow speed and (b) frequency evolution with increasing airflow speed in the resistive-inductive case for the maximum damping

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