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Research Papers

Structure-Borne Sound Characterization of Coupled Structures—Part II: Feasibility Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Goran Pavić1

Laboratoire Vibrations-Acoustique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne, Francegoran.pavic@insa-lyon.fr

Andrew S. Elliott

Acoustics, Audio and Video Group, University of Salford, Salford M54WT, UKa.s.elliott@salford.ac.uk

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 132(4), 041009 (Jun 01, 2010) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000981 History: Received June 05, 2009; Revised December 14, 2009; Published June 01, 2010; Online June 01, 2010

A novel method has been outlined in the first part of this paper aimed at characterization of structure-borne sound transmission from a vibration source coupled via resilient mounts to a receiver. It can deliver the source mobility and its free velocity, together with the mobility of the receiver to which the source is connected, without decoupling the two structures. The only condition which has to be fulfilled is the conservation of coupling forces and moments across the mounts. In this part of the paper the method is examined from the feasibility point of view. A benchmark test is used as a validation reference for the method, where the properties of the resilient mounts are required and are assumed as known but not completely certain. The feasibility of the principal method is tested by virtual experiment involving two built-up plates resiliently connected at several points. The comparison of the benchmark and the principal method is used to illustrate the benefits of the latter given a small error in the supposedly known mount properties.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Subsystem mobility moduli; (a): source, (b): receiver; black: Y44, dark gray: Y99, and light gray: Y49. The reference values of the three mobilities are 1 mN−1 s−1, 1 m−1 N−1 s−1, and 1 N−1 s−1, respectively.

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Figure 3

Mobility moduli of the mount; thick lines: axial velocity/force; thin lines: rotation velocity/moment; black line: driving-point mobility; gray line: transfer mobility

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Figure 4

Moduli of reconstructed mobility of the source ((a), (c), (e)) and the receiver ((b), (d), (f)) via known mount mobilities; top: Y44, middle: Y99, and bottom: Y49; dark gray line: excitation applied at the source side, light gray line: excitation applied at the receiver side, and black line: exact value of mobility

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Figure 5

Global relative rms mobility error: benchmark; (a): averaging across all mobility components, (b): averaging across diagonal components only. Columns from left to right: εs′, εs″, εr′, and εr″.

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Figure 6

13-octave averaged rms mobility error: benchmark; (a) εss: 10% error in the mount sound speed, (b) εrr: 50% error in the mount sound speed

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Figure 7

Global error of the subsystem mobility matrix: benchmark; (a) εss at 10% error in the mount sound speed, (b) εrr: at 50% error in the mount sound speed

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Figure 8

Severe cases of reconstructed mobility: benchmark; (a): source mobility Y26 at 10% error in the mount sound speed, (b): receiver mobility Y12 at 50% error in the mount sound speed; dark gray: excitation at the source side, light gray: excitation at the receiver side, and black: exact value

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Figure 13

Severe cases of global error of the subsystem mobility matrix: principal method; (a): source mobility error: thickness-low, mass density-high, and wave speed-high; (b): receiver mobility error: thickness-high, mass density-high, and wave speed-low.

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Figure 14

Severe cases of reconstructed subsystem mobility: principal method; (a): source mobility Ys5,7, (b): receiver mobility Yr2,9; dark gray: excitation at the source side, light gray: excitation at the receiver side, and black: exact value

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Figure 15

Free source velocity: principal method; (a): point 2, normal component; (b): point 3, y-rotation; gray line: approximate value, black line: exact value

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Figure 16

rms error of free source velocity averaged in 1/3-octave bands: principal method; ordinate: velocity component index

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Figure 17

Real part of receiver mobility Y11; (a): using principal method; (b): benchmark, mount sound speed underestimated by 20%; gray line: exact value; black line: reconstructed using coupled data; right plot, full line: excitation on the source side, dashed line: excitation on the receiver side

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Figure 12

1/3-octave averaged rms mobility error: principal method; (a): source mobility error, (b): receiver mobility error. The ordinate scale is labeled as a function of three values (white-low, gray-medium, and black-high) for all the combinations of the three mount parameters: thickness (thck), mass density (mass), and wave speed (wspd).

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Figure 11

Global relative rms mobility error: principal method; (a): averaging across all mobility components, (b): averaging across diagonal components only; Columns from left to right: εs′, εs″, εr′, and εr″

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Figure 10

Moduli of reconstructed mobility of the source ((a), (c), (e)) and the receiver ((b), (d), (f)): principal method; top: Y44, middle: Y99, and bottom: Y49; dark gray line: excitation applied at the source side, light gray line: excitation applied at the receiver side, and black line: exact value of mobility

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Figure 9

Convergence factor β; thick lines: no signal noise, thin lines: signal-to-noise ratio 50 dB, 20 averages; Black: βsβr, dark gray: βs, and light gray: βr

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Figure 1

Coupled two-plate system; the length units are in mm

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