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Research Papers

A Comparative Study on the Local Mean Decomposition and Empirical Mode Decomposition and Their Applications to Rotating Machinery Health Diagnosis

[+] Author and Article Information
Yanxue Wang

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, P.R. Chinayan.xue.wang@gmail.com

Zhengjia He

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, P.R. Chinahzj@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Yanyang Zi

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, P.R. China

J. Vib. Acoust 132(2), 021010 (Mar 18, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000770 History: Received November 24, 2008; Revised June 08, 2009; Published March 18, 2010; Online March 18, 2010

Health diagnosis of the rotating machinery can identify potential failure at its early stage and reduce severe machine damage and costly machine downtime. In recent years, the adaptive decomposition methods have attracted many researchers’ attention, due to less influences of human operators in the practical application. This paper compares two adaptive methods: local mean decomposition (LMD) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) from four aspects, i.e., local mean, decomposed components, instantaneous frequency, and the waveletlike filtering characteristic through numerical simulation. The comparative results manifest that more accurate instantaneous frequency and more meaningful interpretation of the signals can be acquired by LMD than by EMD. Then LMD and EMD are both exploited in the health diagnosis of two actual industrial rotating machines with rub-impact and steam-excited vibration faults, respectively. The results reveal that LMD seems to be more suitable and have better performance than EMD for the incipient fault detection. LMD is thus proved to have potential to become a powerful tool for the surveillance and diagnosis of rotating machinery.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 23

Decomposed results of temporal signal in Fig. 2 (a) by LMD and (b) by EMD

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Figure 24

Comparison between (a) PF3 and (b) IMF3

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Figure 1

The flowchart of the LMD

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Figure 2

The flowchart of the EMD

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Figure 3

The computed local mean local magnitude by the LMD together with the upper and lower envelopes by the EMD. Overshoots of the EMD are indicated by arrows.

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Figure 4

The decomposed results and residue of a synthetic multicomponent signal: (a) by LMD and (b) by EMD

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Figure 5

The sketch of computing IA and IF by LMD and EMD

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Figure 6

3D plot of a simulated signal

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Figure 10

Waveletlike filtering characteristic of the (a) LMD and (b) EMD

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Figure 11

The comparison between the equivalent high-pass and first band-pass filters of the LMD and EMD

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Figure 12

(a) Raw vibration signal and (b) its Fourier spectrum spectrum

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Figure 13

PFs extracted from signal in Fig. 1 by using LMD

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Figure 14

Decomposed results of signal in Fig. 1 by using LMD: (a) IAs, (b) IFs (solid line), and the mean of IFs (dashed line)

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Figure 15

IMFs extracted from signal in Fig. 1 by EMD

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Figure 16

Decomposed results of signal in Fig. 1 by using EMD: (a) IAs, (b) IFs (solid line), and the mean of IFs (dashed line)

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Figure 17

(a) Raw real vibration signal and (b) its Fourier spectrum

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Figure 18

PFs computed by the LMD

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Figure 19

(a) IAs and (b) IFs obtained from the temporal signal in Fig. 1 by LMD

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Figure 20

IMFs extracted from the temporal signal in Fig. 1

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Figure 21

(a) IAs and (b) IFs computed by the EMD from the temporal signal in Fig. 1

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Figure 22

The waveform and spectra of vibration signals collected by two transducers fixed on sides of high pressure cylinder: (a) by left transducer and (b) by right transducer

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Figure 7

The decomposed results and residue of the signal in Fig. 6: (a) by LMD and (b) by EMD

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Figure 8

(a) The first output of the LMD, (b) comparison between the computed IF by LMD and the exact IF, and (c) error of the IF

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Figure 9

(a) Comparison between the computed IF by EMD and the exact IF; (b) error of the IF

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