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Technical Briefs

A New Low-Frequency Resonance Sensor for Low Speed Roller Bearing Monitoring

[+] Author and Article Information
Shumin Hou

Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Machine Transmission and Manufacturing Engineering, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430081, People’s Republic of China; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canadamichaelhou2007@gmail.com

Yourong Li, Zhigang Wang

Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Machine Transmission and Manufacturing Engineering, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430081, People’s Republic of China

Ming Liang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada

J. Vib. Acoust 132(1), 014502 (Jan 13, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000773 History: Received December 10, 2008; Revised July 15, 2009; Published January 13, 2010; Online January 13, 2010

The resonance demodulation technique has been widely used to detect rolling bearing faults based on the signal acquired by piezoelectric accelerometers. However, this method is ineffective in extremely low speed applications due to the instrument limitations of many commercial piezoelectric accelerometers. To alleviate this difficulty, we present a low-frequency resonance accelerometer to capture extremely low speed rolling bearing faults. The design details are reported in this paper. With this new sensor, the resonance demodulation technique can be extended to many low rotational speed applications. This has been demonstrated by two industrial cases: (a) bearing fault detection for a tilting mechanism in a converter mill and (b) monitoring a crossed roller bearing of a bucket wheel staker-reclaimer in a thermal power plant.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 14

The faulty bearing signal (application 2)

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Figure 15

The power spectrum of the faulty bearing signal (application 2)

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Figure 16

Envelope waveform (application 2)

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Figure 17

The power spectrum of envelop waveform (application 2)

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Figure 12

The scaled ball of the bearing

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Figure 11

The power spectrum of envelope waveform (application 1)

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Figure 10

Envelope waveform (application 1)

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Figure 9

The power spectrum of the faulty bearing signal (application 1)

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Figure 8

The faulty bearing signal (application 1)

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Figure 7

The power spectrum of the healthy bearing signal (application 1)

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Figure 6

The healthy bearing signal (application 1)

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Figure 5

Sensor installation position

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Figure 4

The selection of the lowest quiet frequency band

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Figure 3

Pictures of (a) a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer and (b) the designed low-frequency accelerometer

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Figure 2

The low-frequency accelerometer: (a) the structure and (b) the full-bridge strain gauge circuit

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Figure 1

(a) Square pulse and (b) its spectrum

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Figure 13

Sensor locations on the slewing support

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