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Research Papers

Sound Transmission Through Simply Supported Finite Double-Panel Partitions With Enclosed Air Cavity

[+] Author and Article Information
F. X. Xin1

MOE Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, P.R. Chinafengxian.xin@gmail.com

T. J. Lu1

MOE Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, P.R. Chinatjlu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

C. Q. Chen

MOE Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, P.R. China; Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P.R. China

1

Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Vib. Acoust. 132(1), 011008 (Jan 11, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000466 History: Received August 02, 2008; Revised June 19, 2009; Published January 11, 2010

The vibro-acoustic performance of a rectangular double-panel partition with enclosed air cavity and simply mounted on an infinite acoustic rigid baffle is investigated analytically. The sound velocity potential method rather than the commonly used cavity modal function method is employed, which possesses good expandability and has significant implications for further vibro-acoustic investigations. The simply supported boundary condition is accounted for by using the method of modal function and the double Fourier series solutions are obtained to characterize the vibro-acoustic behaviors of the structure. The results for sound transmission loss, panel vibration level, and sound pressure level are presented to explore the physical mechanisms of sound energy penetration across the finite double-panel partition. Specifically, focus is placed on the influence of several key system parameters on sound transmission including the thickness of air cavity, structural dimensions, and the elevation angle and azimuth angle of the incidence sound. Further extensions of the sound velocity potential method to typical framed double-panel structures are also proposed.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of sound transmission through a baffled, rectangular, simply supported double-panel partition: (a) global view and (b) side view in the arrow direction in (a)

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Figure 2

Convergence of double Fourier series solution for STL of a double-panel partition under the excitation of a normally incident sound at 6000 Hz

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Figure 3

STL plotted as a function of frequency for a double aluminum panel (m1=m2=0.239 g/cm2, H=7.11 cm; diffuse incident sound): theory versus experiment (22)

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Figure 4

STL plotted as a function of frequency for a double aluminum panel with dimensions a=0.38 m, b=0.30 m, and H=0.048 m (normal incident sound): theory versus experiment (26)

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Figure 5

STL plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions with different thicknesses of enclosed air cavity (normal incident sound)

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Figure 6

Averaged quadratic velocity plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions with different thicknesses of enclosed air cavity (normal incident sound): (a) incidence panel and (b) radiating panel

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Figure 7

Averaged quadratic sound pressure plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions with different thicknesses of enclosed air cavity (normal incident sound)

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Figure 8

STL plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions having different in-plane dimensions (normal incident sound)

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Figure 9

Averaged quadratic velocity plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions having different in-plane dimensions (normal incident sound): (a) incidence panel and (b) radiating panel

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Figure 10

Averaged quadratic sound pressure plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions having different in-plane dimensions (normal incident sound)

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Figure 11

STL plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions excited by incident sound having different elevation angles and fixed azimuth angle (θ=0 deg)

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Figure 12

Averaged quadratic velocity plotted as a function of frequency for double-panel partitions excited by incident sound having different elevation angles and fixed azimuth angle (θ=0 deg): (a) incidence panel and (b) radiating panel

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Figure 13

Dependence of STL on incident sound elevation angel and frequency for fixed azimuth angle θ=0 deg: (a) global view and (b) contour map

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Figure 14

Dependence of STL on incident sound elevation angel and frequency for fixed elevation angle φ=45 deg: (a) global view and (b) contour map

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