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Research Papers

Low Frequency Vibration Isolation Through an Active-on-Active Approach: Coupling Effects

[+] Author and Article Information
Qiao Sun

Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, AL, T2N 1N4, Canadaqsun@ucalgary.ca

Robert A. Wolkow

Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AL, T6G 2J1, Canada; National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, AL, T6G 2M9, Canadarwolkow@ualberta.ca

Mark Salomons

Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AL, T6G 2J1, Canada; National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, AL, T6G 2M9, Canada

J. Vib. Acoust 131(6), 061010 (Nov 20, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000477 History: Received October 20, 2008; Revised May 19, 2009; Published November 20, 2009; Online November 20, 2009

The extreme sensitivity of a scanning probe microscope demands an exceptional noise cancellation device that could effectively cut off a wide range of vibration noise. Existing commercial devices, although excellent in canceling high frequency noise, commonly leave low frequency vibration unattenuated. We design an add-on active stage that can function together with a standalone existing active stage. The objective is to provide a higher level of noise cancellation by lowering the overall system cut-off frequency. This study is concerned with the theoretical aspects of the coupling characteristics involved in stacking independently designed stages together to form a two-stage isolator. Whether an add-on stage would pose a stability threat to the existing stage needs to be addressed. In addition, we explore the use of coupling effects to optimize the performance of the overall system.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Schematic of a second active stage stacked on an existing active stage to provide vertical-axis vibration isolation

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Figure 3

Block diagram of the system transfer functions

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Figure 4

Corner frequencies of the combined system (a) ξ1=ξ2=0 (b) ξ1=ξ2=0.1

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Figure 5

Sudden shift of the corner frequency from above the higher resonant frequency to below as ω1/ω2 increases: ξ1=ξ2=0.1, m2/m1=0.01

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Figure 6

Corner frequency as damping coefficients vary (a) ξ1=ξ2=0.3 and (b) ξ1=ξ2=0.7

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Figure 7

Corner frequencies when two stages have different damping coefficients

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Figure 1

Section view of the active stage to be stacked on an existing active stage

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