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Research Papers

Vibration Suppression of Rotating Machinery Utilizing an Automatic Ball Balancer and Discontinuous Spring Characteristics

[+] Author and Article Information
Jun Liu

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603, Japanliu@nuem.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Yukio Ishida

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603, Japanishida@nuem.nagoya-u.ac.jp

J. Vib. Acoust 131(4), 041004 (Jun 05, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3142872 History: Received June 09, 2007; Revised October 31, 2008; Published June 05, 2009

Automatic ball balancer is a balancing device where two balls inside a hollow rotor move to optimal rest positions automatically to eliminate unbalance. As a result, vibrations are suppressed to the zero amplitude in the rotational speed range higher than the major critical speed. However, it has the following defects. The amplitude of vibration increases in the rotational speed range lower than the major critical speed. In addition, almost periodic motions with large amplitude occur in the vicinity of the major critical speed due to the rolling of balls inside the rotor. Because of these defects, an automatic ball balancer has not been used widely. This paper proposes the vibration suppression method utilizing the discontinuous spring characteristics together with an automatic ball balancer to overcome these defects and to suppress vibration. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed theoretically, numerically, and experimentally. The results show that amplitude of vibration can be suppressed to a small amplitude in the vicinity of the major critical speed and the zero amplitude in the range higher than the major critical speed.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Theoretical model

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Figure 2

Spring characteristic with the additional spring in the x-direction

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Figure 3

The result of the numerical simulation (with only an automatic ball balancer)

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Figure 4

Positions of balls in the stationary solutions

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Figure 5

The results of the theoretical analysis and the numerical simulation (with only an automatic ball balancer)

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Figure 6

With an automatic ball balancer and the additional springs (without a directional difference in stiffness): (a) resonance curves and (b) time history in the x-direction at ω=1.11

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Figure 7

With an automatic ball balancer and the additional springs (with a directional difference in stiffness)

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Figure 8

Experimental setup

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Figure 9

The photographs of experimental setup

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Figure 10

Resonance curve in the original system (experimental result)

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Figure 11

With only an automatic ball balancer (experimental result)

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Figure 12

Position of balls in the range higher than the major rotational speed (experimental result)

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Figure 13

With an automatic ball balancer and the additional springs (experimental result): (a) resonance curve and (b) time history at ω=705 rpm

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