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Research Papers

Analytical Study of Vibration Isolation Between a Pair of Flexible Structures

[+] Author and Article Information
G. T. Zheng1

School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing, Chinagzhengtu@yahoo.co.uk

Y. Q. Tu

Department of Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 131(2), 021006 (Feb 17, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3025839 History: Received August 05, 2007; Revised October 11, 2008; Published February 17, 2009

The problem of flexible structure vibration isolation on a flexible foundation is analytically investigated by simplifying the vibration isolation as single axis isolation, which can be realized by a proper design, and the problem of the whole spacecraft vibration is taken as an example for the application as both the spacecraft (isolated structure) and the launch vehicle (foundation) are flexible structures. A numerical example of the whole spacecraft vibration isolation is also provided for further explaining those conclusions derived from the analytical studies. It is found from the study that the isolator’s damping is important for attenuating the vibration and that weakening the isolator’s stiffness has the same effect as increasing its damping. However, a weaker stiffness means a weaker coupling among the structures and may magnify the vibration at some resonant frequencies, which are close to those of individual structures. The coupling effect of the structure’s flexibility on the isolation may be significant in some cases and a coupling analysis is essential for ensuring the isolation performance. Because of the importance of the isolator’s damping in reducing the vibration transmissibility and the vibration of the coupled structure, it is more appropriate to describe the vibration isolation of the flexible structure as vibration attenuation.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

The longitudinal transmissibility from the bottom of the PAF/isolator to the top of the spacecraft

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Figure 3

The longitudinal transmissibility from the bottom of the PAF/isolator to the top of the PAF/isolator

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Figure 4

The longitudinal acceleration response at the top of the spacecraft when unit force is input at the bottom of the launch vehicle

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Figure 5

The longitudinal acceleration response at the top of the PAF/isolator when unit force is input at the bottom of the launch vehicle

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Figure 6

The lateral transmissibility from the bottom of the PAF/isolator to the top of the spacecraft

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Figure 7

The lateral transmissibility from the bottom of the PAF/isolator to the top of the PAF/isolator

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Figure 8

The lateral acceleration response at the top of the satellite when unit force is input at the bottom of the launch vehicle

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Figure 9

The lateral acceleration response at the top of the PAF/isolator when unit force is input at the bottom of the launch vehicle

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Figure 1

Schematic of the coupled structure formed by the launch vehicle, the vibration isolation device, and the launch vehicle

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