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Research Papers

Methods for Multimodal Vibration Suppression and Energy Harvesting Using Piezoelectric Actuators

[+] Author and Article Information
Justin Wilhelm

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1100 Mechanical Engineering, 111 Church Street South East, Minneapolis, MN 55455

Rajesh Rajamani

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1100 Mechanical Engineering, 111 Church Street South East, Minneapolis, MN 55455rajamani@me.umn.edu

J. Vib. Acoust 131(1), 011001 (Dec 29, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2980378 History: Received July 19, 2007; Revised July 18, 2008; Published December 29, 2008

This paper presents a novel method for suppressing multimodal vibrations in structures by using the controlled harvesting and storage of vibration energy as electrical charge. Unlike a traditional semi-active system in which vibration energy is dissipated using a controlled variable dissipater, the proposed system harvests vibration energy for storage. The stored energy can then be recycled enabling the system to achieve a vibration reduction performance superior to that of a traditional semi-active system and approaching that of a fully active system. In the proposed method, an array of one or more precharged capacitors is employed to provide a selection of various voltages, which may be selected to approximate a desired control signal defined by an LQR multimodal vibration controller. The capacitors can apply a control voltage to the piezoelectric actuators and can also collect current generated by the actuators as the structure strains in vibration. Both a single capacitor system and a multi-capacitor system are considered and applied to a cantilevered beam. The response to impulse disturbances and random force disturbances are studied. The results are compared to a previously proposed energy harvesting based semi-active method. Advantages in both vibration suppression and energy harvesting performance over the previously proposed method are demonstrated. The multicapacitor method is found to be most effective due to its ability to apply sufficiently large control voltages while moderating large step inputs therefore reducing the excitation of higher frequency uncontrolled modes, which otherwise parasitically dissipate energy in the circuit resistance.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the cantilevered beam system

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Figure 2

Diagram for the RL switching circuit

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Figure 3

Schematic and circuit diagram of the single switched capacitor method

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Figure 4

Schematic of the multiple switched capacitor method

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Figure 5

Preset voltages of capacitors for the multiple switched capacitor method

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Figure 6

Mode functions of the cantilevered beam

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Figure 7

Mode function second derivatives

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Figure 8

Corrected mode functions for the diagonalized system

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Figure 9

Impulse test results for the RL switching

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Figure 10

Impulse test results for the single switched capacitor

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Figure 11

Impulse test results for the multiple switched capacitors method

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Figure 12

Impulse response with no vibration suppression applied

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Figure 13

Random excitation test results for the RLS method (random sequence 1)

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Figure 14

Random excitation test results for the SSC method (random sequence 1)

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Figure 15

Random excitation test results for the MSC method (random sequence 1)

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Figure 16

Energy harvesting efficiencies from random excitation tests

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Figure 17

Irms values from random excitation tests

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