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Research Papers

Effect of Friction on the Performance of an Octostrut Vibration Isolation Platform

[+] Author and Article Information
L. He1

Department of Space Engineering and Applied Mechanics, P.O. Box 137, School of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin, People's Republic of Chinaheling̱78@163.com

L. K. Liu

Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tsinghua University, P.O. Box 20, 100084 Beijing, Chinaliulk@tsinghua.edu.cn

L. Liang

Department of Space Engineering and Applied Mechanics, P.O. Box 137, School of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 137, 150001 Harbin, People's Republic of Chinalianglu@hit.edu.cn

G. T. Zheng

Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tsinghua University, P.O. Box 20, 100084 Beijing, Chinagtzhengtu@yahoo.co.uk

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 130(5), 051003 (Aug 12, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2948378 History: Received October 31, 2006; Revised April 02, 2008; Published August 12, 2008

To improve the dynamic environment of a spacecraft, an octostrut vibration isolation platform is designed to replace the payload attach fitting, which can significantly attenuate the vibration transmitted to payload except that an extra isolation frequency is introduced. However, it is found from the experimental results that when the excitation amplitude is lower than a certain level, the first resonance occurs at a higher frequency (i.e., the isolation frequency). This is caused by the nonlinearity that is a result of the friction existing in every actuator. Therefore, in this paper, the friction force of the single actuator is taken into account and is described by a bilinear hysteresis model. With this friction force model, a new nonlinear model of the octostrut vibration isolation platform is established. Meanwhile, the harmonic balance method is used to solve the nonlinear equations. The theoretical and experimental results indicate that the friction plays an important role in the performance of the platform. It is identified from the study that to ensure the performance of an isolator, in its design, either the maximum friction force or the minimum excitation should be restricted.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The OVIP assembly

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Figure 2

The schematic of experimental setup

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Figure 3

The OVIP on the shaker for longitudinal vibration test

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Figure 4

Longitudinal excitation spectra (with 40kg payload)

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Figure 5

Longitudinal experimental results of platform (with 40kg payload)

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Figure 6

The OVIP on the shaker for lateral vibration test

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Figure 7

Lateral excitation spectra (with 40kg payload)

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Figure 8

Lateral experimental results of platform (with 40kg payload): (a) Input spectra and (b) transmissibility

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Figure 9

Longitudinal experimental results of the platform (with 30kg payload): (a) Input spectra and (b) transmissibility

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Figure 10

Lateral experimental results of platform (30kg payload)

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Figure 11

Relation of the hysteresis force and the displacement

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Figure 12

The equivalent model of the ith strut

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Figure 13

Longitudinal experimental results of platform (40kg payload)

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Figure 14

Lateral experimental results of platform (40kg payload)

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Figure 15

Longitudinal experimental results of platform (30kg payload)

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Figure 16

Lateral experimental results of platform (30kg payload)

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Figure 17

The first resonant frequency versus friction force and excitation amplitude in longitudinal direction

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Figure 18

The first resonant frequency versus friction force and excitation amplitude in lateral direction

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