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Research Papers

Monitoring the Onset and Propagation of Natural Degradation Process in a Slow Speed Rolling Element Bearing With Acoustic Emission

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Elforjani

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKelforjani@gmail.com

D. Mba

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKd.mba@cranfield.ac.uk

J. Vib. Acoust 130(4), 041013 (Jul 15, 2008) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2948413 History: Received October 23, 2007; Revised April 30, 2008; Published July 15, 2008

The monitoring and diagnosis of rolling element bearings with the high frequency acoustic emission (AE) technology has been ongoing since the late 1960s. This paper demonstrates the use of AE measurements to detect, locate, and monitor natural defect initiation and propagation in a conventional rolling element bearing. To facilitate the investigation a special purpose test rig was built to allow for accelerated natural degradation of a bearing race. It is concluded that subsurface initiation and subsequent crack propagation can be detected with the AE technology. The paper also presents comparative results between AE and vibration diagnosis.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Schematic of the data acquisition systems

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Figure 4

Test bearing with attached sensors

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Figure 5

Breaking lead pencil at four different positions

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Figure 6

Relative attenuation at four different positions

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Figure 7

Relative attenuation at three different positions

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Figure 8

Source location layout for linear detection

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Figure 9

Test conditions run until visually observable surface damage, Case I

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Figure 10

Classical AE parameters associated with Case I

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Figure 11

AE wave form associated with Case I

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Figure 12

Crack zones on flat ring associated with Case I

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Figure 13

Test running-in stage associated with Case I (1h operation)

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Figure 14

Crack onset stage associated with Case I (4h operation)

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Figure 15

Crack propagation stage associated with Case I (10h operation)

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Figure 16

Crack propagation stage associated with Case I (12h operation)

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Figure 17

Surface damage locations associated with Case I (16h operation)

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Figure 18

Test conditions run until visually observable surface damage, Case II

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Figure 19

Classical AE parameters associated with Case II

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Figure 20

AE wave form associated with Case II

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Figure 21

Crack zone on flat ring associated with Case II

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Figure 22

Test running-in stage associated with Case II (1h operation)

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Figure 23

Crack onset stage associated with Case II (4h operation)

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Figure 24

Crack propagation stage associated with Case II (10h operation)

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Figure 25

Crack propagation stage associated with Case II (14h operation)

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Figure 26

Surface damage location associated with Case II (18h operation)

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